Friendship Bracelets

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When I was a kid, one thing I remember doing was sitting and hand-making lovely little bracelets that we called Friendship bracelets. I used to love doing that so I thought it would be fun to revisit. They are really easy to make, don’t require any additional tools (like needles or hooks) and can be made almost anywhere! Heck, I remember my sister sitting in the back seat of the family car on long road trips, her floss pinned to the knee of her jeans, braiding & knotting away as we traveled.

All you need for this project are the following items:

  • embroidery floss (thin yarn also works)
  • scissors
  • scotch tape or safety pins
  • tape measure

First step is to cut your floss. I always used to hold the floss in my left hand and measure it up to my shoulder (that’s how my mom taught me). But you can also measure the width of your wrist and multiple by 5 to get an appropriate length. This is going to seem really long but remember, you are braiding/weaving/knotting it so it will shorten the finished product. If you are using different colors for patterns, cut one stand with measure and then you can use that as a ruler for the other strands/colors!

Let’s just focus this post on easiest, basic beginner so we will only do six strands of floss and only three colors in one bracelet. Once your floss is cut, you will lay all three colors together and tie a knot into one end. Then adhere it to a table top or your pant leg or a pillow. Braid a simple braid three inches down (you will be doing this at the end of the bracelet too). After you have your 3 inches of braid, knot under the braid again.

 

Now to the detailed part of our bracelet! Choose what order you want your colors to go in. Example: I’m using yellow, green, pink, blue, orange and purple in that order. Arrange your floss in the order you want from left to right. The first row will be the farthest left-hand color. So my first row will be yellow, followed by green, then pink, then blue, then orange, and finally purple.

Take the first two strands (yellow and green) and pass the first strand OVER the second, then behind the same strand. Basically, you are knotting your first color around the second strand. Pull this up toward the top knot gently to tighten it. Don’t pull it super tight, just pull it up lightly so that it is knotted around the strand snug. Do this a second time on the same strand (there should be TWO knots on each strand). Follow these same steps for the rest of the row. So same snug knot of yellow around the pink strand, then the blue strand, then the orange strand, then the purple strand.

You will now have a row of yellow bumps across the top of your bracelet.

Start again at the left (this would now be my green strand) and do exact same steps across the row. Continue doing this until you have 3-4 inches of knotting done.

Once you have the amount of rows you need (roughly 3-4 inches worth), gather all the strands together and make a large knot (like we did at the very start). Then simply braid three more inches, knot again and snip excess floss from ends.

Voila! Friendship Bracelet Achievement Unlocked!

Happy crafting, friends!


Small Kitchen? Maximize Your Space!

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Happy Monday, friends! First off, I apologize for my absence. Had a bit of a family emergency but everything is looking better now. So I’m back to provide you with some fun ways to organize your kitchen!

I’m going to brag for a moment. I have been blessed to live in a lovely, LARGE and affordable apartment in Chicago-land. There really is only one thing I don’t like about it and that is the size of the kitchen. I love to bake and am getting more into cooking as I age so the lack of counter space has been a real challenge for me. There is also fairly limited storage space. Because of this, I am always looking for ways I can make the most out of the least space.

One problem with my storage is that I LOVE coffee cups; the geekier, the better (which explains my absolute and total adoration of the lovely HandPainted Nerd whom I’ve featured on this very blog). But I find I am running out of room in my cabinet for all my pretties. Some of the mugs are larger than standard size too. So when I saw this wall mount, I thought, “What a gorgeous idea!” Not only would this clear up some cabinet space but it also creates some awesome decoration for my blank walls in the dining area and puts all my beautiful mugs on display.

I also don’t have a lot of under the sink space and this is where I keep both my garbage can and recycle bin (so my HeloKitteh can’t get into them). Right now, I have sponges, scrub brushes and extra rubber gloves along with bottles of cleaning solutions just sort of strewn about under there. However, with some adhesive hooks and plastic baskets attached to the insider of the cabinet drawers, all those sponges and gloves can be put in one, easy-to-reach spot and never get lost in the bowels of the under-sink. Using an adjustable curtain rod can give you a place to hang those bottles out of the way. Doing this allows me space to put my dish drainer under the sink when not in use and opens up a bit more counter space.

One other thing I struggle with is where to put my fruits and veggies. Sure, some of them go into the fridge but the majority don’t require refrigeration so they end up on my one already small counter top.

This is where the wonderful ModernMomLife comes to the rescue. This tutorial walks you though an easy and inexpensive way to get your produce up off the counter. And it looks great too!

But what about those fruits and veggies in the fridge? Some of our readers my have gorgeous new appliances with crisper drawers and the like. My fridge is older than God so it’s pretty much just wire racks. Solution? Office supply store! Plastic desk organizers can be re-purposed into your very own fridge separation and organization.

 

 

The other thing that takes up a lot of space in my kitchen are my baking and cooking supplies; namely the baking sheets, muffin tins, and pots & pans. Now, the pots and pans can nest and for the most part, don’t take up a lot of room. But those lids…there’s just no easy way to stack them. So I say, don’t even try! You can hang a magazine rack or even a metal towel rung onto the insides of your cabinet doors or a wall in the kitchen and just slide them onto it. For the cookie sheets and muffin tins, a simple wicker basket from Target will suffice and you can mount a floating shelf on a door (if you have high ceilings like me) to store it out of the way.

              

There are always very simple and easy solutions to maximizing your storage space. I hope today’s blog helped someone out there to really open up their kitchen.

Happy Organizing, people!


Sewing with Scraps – Sandwich Wrap

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A bit of a step back in difficulty from last week, and yet this one is slightly more annoying to make (more on that in a bit, lol). So we go thru a lot of plastic baggies for conventions and I thought this pattern would be great to help reduce on that waste! Not to mention you can claim a fabric as ‘yours’ so no more need to write a name on bags either! 😀

These are plastic sandwich wraps from the ladies at Chica and Jo. Now, right off the bat, I’m gonna admit that I changed one main aspect about this pattern. While it walks you thru the steps very nicely for how to make fused plastic from extra plastic shopping bags…none of my attempts really ended up with something I liked. We also have been using reusable shopping bags here for years so I didn’t have much to work with. Instead I just bought some plastic from Joanns for like $3 a yard. Totally worth it.

Okay, so it’s hard to see since my plastic is clear, but want to cut a 14″x14″ square of the fabric and a 12″x12″ square of the plastic. With wrong side facing you for the fabric, lay the plastic on top; centering it to give a 1″ border all around. Now the next step is hard to explain and I couldn’t be bothered to take pics of it, but basically you have to do a double fold over all around the border and pin it in place. See the Chica and Jo site for great photos to walk you thru it. I personally used my iron to hold down the first 1/2″ fold to make my pinning life easier, but you do what works for you.

With all your pins in place, you simply sew around the boarder to attach these two. I recommend sewing as close to the fold as you feel comfortable to reduce the size of the hangover for your finished piece. Once that’s done you just need to add velcro; which is used to hold your wrap in place. You’ll need 2 pieces total: a 1″ long and a 2″ long piece. Now the only velcro I have is 2″ wide, so I just did two 1″x2″ pieces. You’ll be attaching them in the corners with 2 on the inside, and 2 on the outside.

Once they’re on, that’s it! You have a finished wrap! The plastic will make it very easy to clean up as you can just wipe off and dressing/condiments or even toss the whole piece in the wash for bad stains. I wouldn’t recommend putting it in the dryer (cause plastic), but just let it air dry by laying flat instead.

Overall I give this pattern 4/5 bobbins. It seems like it can work great, and I look forward to giving it a try at C2E2 this weekend, but until I do I can’t say as to how well it performs. I may come back and give it 5/5 if it amazing, lol.


Sewing with Scraps – Earbud Pouch

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Okay, so I probably queued these out of order as this is the pattern I learned how to make a tab from which I put in the tissue pattern for last week, but I was trying to do these in increasing order of difficulty sooooo……sorry. XD

Anyway, this is the first pattern I found using the scraps and what made me dig to find more as I thought that was something useful in daily life. The pattern comes from Dog Under my Desk and it’s probably one of my favorites from how high quality it looks when you’re done.

Materials needed were about a 6″x7″ piece of fabric for both inner and outer fabrics along with the same amount for interfacing (midweight again). A keyring (or hook) and a 5″ or longer plastic zipper.

You’ll have to print out the provided template, but it prints true to form so as long as you have a printer you’re good to go. Cut your fabric per the pattern requirements while your iron warms up. Then apply interfacing to the circle and 2 half circles for the fabric you want showing. Now, I’m not even going to try and write up how to explain adding the zipper cause I’ll screw it up, lol, but that where you’ll start by layering the half circles on one side (curved ends facing the zipper with right sides of the fabric facing each other), sewing, pressing, and then repeating on the other side. You’ll end up with something like this.

Next you’ll make the tab and sew it at the top of the circle edge where the zipper pulled from. I accidentally did this at the bottom on my first one. So learn from my mistakes, lol. The tab should be laying on the zipper track towards the inside of circle when you do it.

Now, making sure you zipper is in the middle of your circle, layer the circles with right sides out -not touching- and lay it on top of the zipper (yes you’re covering the zipper. This is why it needs to be half way down so you can reach inside). The the fabric you want on the outside should be touching when you do this. So for me, zelda fabric touching zelda fabric and green on the top.

Start anywhere you like, but I did it at the tab on the top. I also recommend do a few back and forth stitches here to reinforce that tab. You’ll want a 3/8″ seam on this one, so give yourself extra room and if it starts to bunch/pucker then stop sewing, lift the foot and smooth things out before continuing. Once you’ve sewn the edge, you also want to pinking shears to trim the edge. I used scissors my first time to clip the circle and the shears work waaaay better. This is why you had to leave so much space for your seam. Once you’re done just turn it inside out and ta da! You’ve got a pouch!

I really like how this looked and part of that admittedly is cause I did fussy cutting to get the image centered just how I wanted. It’s really just a nice little case and I may even make some as gifts for my family. 🙂 Overall I’d rate this a 5/5 bobbins. Great little pattern, but take your time and follow the step by step info at Dog Under my Desk and not my general ramblings.

 


Sewing with Scraps – Tissue Pouch

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In case it wasn’t obvious with the first 2 scrap patterns I reviewed, I was looking for things I would personally make use of. This will of course vary for everyone, but I just figured I’d let you all know my mind set when I was finding projects so you have an idea of what’s to come. Today’s pattern is a travel tissue pouch that I had to dig up in a web archive as the original site long gone. You can find that archived pattern here, but I’m going to include more info since I don’t know how long that archive will last. I recommend saving the page if you want to follow the original pattern while you work. I even made into a pdf. The original credit for this pattern goes to So Sew Something.

So first you’ll need to gather your materials All you need for this is just 2 pieces of scrap fabric measuring 6″x7″ and sewing thread. I decided to use a little extra fabric and add a loop so I can hang this from a purse or something in the future. I have it pinned just to mark placement as this does not get sewn on until much later. It’s made from a 2″ wide and 3″ long piece that I folded into quarters (with edges folded to meet in the middle and then folded in half) and then sewed around the edge of it to keep it together.

Just like last week’s pattern, you’ll want to place the right (aka printed) side of the fabric together and sew a 1/4″ seam around the edge. Start on the 7″ edge and leave a 3″ gap so you can turn it inside out. Once you’ve turned it inside out, push out all the corners (use a stick to help if needed) and press it with a hot iron.

Now, with the fabric you want showing on top, fold the edges in so they meet evenly in the middle. (NOTE: If you want to add a loop like I did simply place the loop inside the pouch with the edge just visible at the top. I recommend using a pin to keep it in place until you sew it.) Yes this makes it seem like it will be inside, but it will not.

Do another 1/4″ seam on the top and bottom now. This will be hard to do on the top if you added a loop since you’re going through so many layers. You may want a jean needle if you worry about the normal one breaking. I only use jean needles cause I mainly use my machine to sew through yarn and velcro, lol. Anyway, once you’ve done your seam on both edges, turn your piece inside out once more, using your fingers to pop the corners out as you do.

And you’re done! Now you’ll see the little line on mine at the opening but if you had your opening on the 7″ side you won’t have that. I did mine on the 6″ side for this first batch like the pattern said to do, and then had to add these lines to close up the hole. Hopefully my suffering will save you trouble in the end. 🙂 I also  have my edges over lapping slightly to help cover the opening a bit since I won’t always have a pack of tissues and may just fold some up and put them in. You can add things like buttons to help keep it closed, but that’s beyond my skill right now, lol. Overall I think this is another great easy pattern. Probably on par with the cord keeper one from last week. You don’t need interfacing, but I know I messed up on the forgetting to turn something inside out again step so just go slow until you get into the groove of the pattern. I also made it hard by adding the tab (which I messed up like 3 times, lol) so don’t to that until you’ve made it once the normal way unless you’re more skilled then I am, lol. I’d give it 5/5 bobbins again. Great little pattern.


Sewing with Scraps – Cord Wraps

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So the scrap sewing pattern this week was another one that was picked cause I needed something to manage the spaghetti factory of cables I have collected, and comes from Leafy Treetop. I recently gave my sister my old laptop case since she needed one for work and mine was just being used to hold all my various charging cables as I no longer have a laptop. This left me with the issue of about 10 cables that now suddenly needed a new home and to be organized. Time to put that scrap to work!

The time for this was much faster then the mousepad last week since I had no drying time, and once I knew what I was doing, I had these setup assembly line style to sew up and save time. You’ll need 2 scraps that are about 3″x7″ and interfacing (midweight) for each cord wrap, along with a bit of velcro. I buy velcro by the giant spool for my chain chomp plush, so I just cut some off to whatever size I needed but I think anything 1″x1″ or there abouts will work.

Using the template, I cut out the fabric needed for the first few (and then more later cause I didn’t make enough, lol). I decided to frame the images on some of the fabric (known as fussy cutting) so I used more scrap then I had to as a result, but that was my choice so it didn’t bother me toooooo much. Once everything was cut, I ironed the interfacing on the back (or wrong) side of the fabric I wanted to have showing. Then I placed the 2 fabrics, right side facing together, next to my machine to sew.

I sewed around the edge without pins (cause this was so small) about 1/4″ from the edge. I have a special foot that Toni suggested to me for this exact purpose and it really helped a lot. You have to leave about a 2-3″ gap in your sewing so you can turn your piece inside out and then iron and sew around the edge once more.

Now that the body is done, you simply place and sew the velcro on as you desire. the first few I did I used vertical strips just on the ends, but I wanted to be able to tighten it more so for the second batch I had the velcro go horizontal on the body. It does mean the design is covered more, but I know the kind of jostling my cords will take and just felt like the initial batch won’t stay in the keeper as well. Time will tell if I’m wrong about this, lol.

As you can see from this picture of my first batch, I forgot to sew the right sides together on one. Opps! I just said screw it and I’m living with it, but if you were making these as gifts or for someone else, then maybe don’t work at like 10pm like I did, lol. In the end I really liked this pattern. It was very easy to follow (lots of pictures) and a great introduction to interfacing if you’ve never used it before. The pattern is simple and besides the small change in velcro placement I’m very happy with everything. I’d give it a 5/5 bobbins. Highly recommend it.


Sewing with Scraps – Mouse Pad

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As Toni can verify, I’ve had a very cautious approach to using a sewing machine. I took classes in school sure, but I was already very good at sewing by hand even then and the machines were so old that half to time they didn’t work. So while I’ve learned a few things and how newer models work, I would still default to hand sewing for years. Well I decided to change all that starting a few weekends back. My sister is a fashion major and, as my birthday gift, offer to sew me a new purse as long as I had the pattern and materials ready for her. After she was done (and it’s super cute) I had about half a yard of scraps that I didn’t want to just toss. My thriftiness wouldn’t allow it! So I scoured the internet for ideas that I could use these bits and pieces for. I found tons of ideas but only about 8 appealed to me. For the next few weeks I’m going to highlight each one I picked, how easy it was for a beginner, and how I feel the final product turned out. Today I started with what seemed to be the simplest of the lot, a mousepad.

Now I’ve been considering buying a mousepad for my desk for a few months as my mouse has worn thru some of the top finish in spots, but it’s started catching on those so the timing here was almost perfect. It would also allow my to make something that would fit the very unusual size I would need (10″ by 6″) for my small desk space. Following the instructions from How Joyful, I gathered my materials.

What you see here is my cut fabric, some dollar store shelf liner, and a paper towel. You basically sandwich these together (fabric, liner, paper towel) and pin in place before sewing – if needed. The paper towel is used to keep the needle from sticking to the rubber bottom of the non-slip liner, so you could use something like tissue paper instead if you don’t have any paper towels on hand.

After you sew around the edge, you then turn it over and slowly rip off the paper towel. Doing the edges first makes removing the middle much, much easier. Try and get as much off as you can since you’ll want the rubber of bottom mat to be able to smoothly touch the surface.

Now for the time consuming part. You flip it back over and apply Mod Podge to the fabric side in a nice even coat. You’ll want 2-3 coats of modge podge total and it’s an hour to dry between coats, so be sure to set it up on some parchment paper or surface you can easily clean. I did my first coat at night and then the second in the morning, but you do with what works for your schedule. Now if yours is anything like mine, the edges started to curl during the drying and I wasn’t having that. I recommend taking a hot dry iron once it’s fully dry (mine was set to cotton since that was my fabric), place parchment paper over the mouse pad and then iron it to fix this.

Here’s my mouse pad at it’s new home. I also trimmed the edges of extra fabric/rubber pad so it looked nice and neat after ironing it. So what did I think of it in the end? Well, there’s a few things I’d change but overall it’s a great easy pattern for a beginner. I don’t like how the surface feels for mine, but that could be on the type of modpodge I used, and it’s much thinner then a normal mouse pad so maybe adding some interfacing on the back of the fabric would fix that issue. Other then that, only time will tell if it holds up to daily use. I rate it 4/5 bobbins. Good and easy, but needs tweaking for personal preference.


Bathroom Cleanliness — The Homemade Way

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I don’t know about you guys but nothing makes me happier that a spic-n-span bathroom. Over the last year, I have been endeavoring to be completely cruelty-free and as natural as possible in all my product usage. Alas, almost all of the highly rated and well-known cleaning products are not cruelty-free and are also choke full of chemicals. So I started researching and found some store-sold alternatives (Method and Seventh Generation are good options). But then, I started wondering if, like my bath salts, could I make cleaning products out of more natural ingredients? And guess what? I CAN! And so can you!

One of my favorite sites to research and find recipes to try is The Soap Queen. (Seriously, check out this site. It is super useful and tons of fun!) I found two recipes off this site to assist in creating a sparkling clean loo. The first is for a Natural Soap Scum Cleaner.

Ingredients:

  • Three 8 oz Bail Jars
  • 18 oz Baking Soda
  • 3 heaping Tbsp Pumice
  • 6 oz Epsom Salt
  • 2 mL Lemongrass Essential Oil
  • 5 mL Fir Needle Essential Oil

Directions:

*Add baking soda and Epsom salt to large mixing container. (Sift baking soda to unclump). Then add pumice and mix ingredients with a spoon or your hands. Add lemongrass and fir needle essential oils and mix thoroughly to combine. Transfer the mixture to the bail jars. Before use, test a bit on a hidden part of your shower to make sure it won’t scratch the surface.*

Next up is a Fizzy Toiler Freshener. No one likes having to scrub a toilet and these homemade tablets are a quick way to give your whole bathroom a boost of freshness.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup sodium bicarbonate
  • 1/4 cup citric acid
  • Witch Hazel (in a spray bottle)
  • 12 mL Lemon essential oil
  • 6 mL Peppermint essential oil (2nd distilled)
  • Spiral Flower Wax Tart Mold

Directions:

*Add baking soda and citric acid to a large bowl. If lumpy, break apart with your fingers or sift. Then add 12 mL lemon essential oil and 6 mL peppermint essential oil, 2nd distillation. Using gloved hands, mix the essential oils into the dry ingredients. The moisture level of the mixture is important; it should be wet enough that a handful of the squeezed powder will hold shape. Spritz with witch hazel if you need a bit more moisture but be careful with how much. Too much of the witch hazel will ruin the fizziness of your tabs.

Press the mixture into your molds and leave overnight. To use, simply drop one into your toilet bowl and let fizz, then flush.*

And finally, there is a recipe for the Best Homemade Bathroom Cleaner Ever, brought to you by The Wellness Mama. This is also a paste, however, the baking soda and vinegar make it highly effective. (Seriously, guys. There is no better cleaning product than baking soda. There is a reason our grandmothers all used it for, like, everything.)

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup baking soda
  • 1/2 cup washing soda
  • 1/2 cup liquid castille soap (I recommend Dr. Bronner’s, it really is the best)
  • 25 drops of tea tree essential oil
  • 10 drops peppermint essential oil
  • 2 Tbsp white vinegar (optional)

Directions:

*Mix baking soda, washing soda, and liquid castille soap in medium-sized container until it’s pasty and mushy. Add essential oils and mix thoroughly. If you choose to add the vinegar, be aware that the soda will make it fizz a little. It’ll stop so don’t freak out. Then, to use, just scoop a little out with a sponge and scrub away!*

As with anything that you use essential or carrier oils in, you’ll want to store your products in either dark glass or opaque containers (steel spray bottles are good also). This will keep them from growing mold or bacteria or going rancid. Make sure you are also storing these items in a cool, dry space.

We all love a clean, sparkling and fresh-scented bathroom; even those of you out there with boys in the house can achieve this with no chemicals to harm your loved ones.

Happy Cleaning, Crafters!

~Scribe Sarah~


DIY Stained Glass Votive Candle Holders

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Good morning, hacky friends! Happy start of the week to you all! I hope that you all had a restful weekend (but if it wasn’t restful, I hope it was at least productive).

By now, you all know how much I adore DIY projects and refurbishing things around the house. Well, this weekend, I decided to try out an idea to make your own stained glass votive candle holders. This is a very inexpensive way to decorate for whatever occasion you want. All you need are the following items:

  • Tissue Paper
  • Matte finish Mod Podge
  • Paintbrush
  • Scissors
  • Glass Containers that hold votives
  • Paper Punches (optional)
  • Q-Tips (optional)

You can pick up glass containers that fit votive candles at any Dollar Tree. But look around your house too. You never know when and where you will find the perfect items to rehab.

First, you want to cut out your shapes from your tissue paper. You can use the scissors to make you own shapes or paper punches to save some time or if you want a more uniform look. Once you have those cut out, set them aside.

Next, scoop out a bit of the Mod Podge with your paintbrush. You can use school glue if you can’t get your hands on Mod Podge. Thin it out very slightly with some water (don’t add too much water or it will saturate your tissue paper, causing it to tear more easily). Place the tissue paper onto your glass and gently affix with the Mod Podge. Be patient and gentle brushing the Mod Podge on or your tissue paper will tear. Once you have your shapes affixed how you want, let the object dry completely.

The dried Mod Podge will give any portion of glass without tissue paper a frosted appearance. If you don’t like or want that, take a Q-Tip and some hot water and scrub the glass sections clean. of the Mod Podge.

Once complete, place a votive candle into the glass, light it and enjoy. You can make holiday specific ones or just everyday decoration. These also make great centerpieces for weddings and banquets. As projects go, this one was easy and inexpensive and thankfully, did not turn into a “Pinterest Fail.”

Enjoy!

~Scribe Sarah~


DIY Doorstops out of Concrete Patio Stones

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It’s Monday, my friends, and today we’re going to talk about doorstops. If you’re like me, you live in an older building and while they do have tons of character, they may also have one other thing; uneven rooms. Most of the doors in my apartment don’t stay open when I want them to. What’s a girl to do?

Well, a girl can go to any home improvement supply store and pick up a few concrete patio stones. You can use regular bricks as well, but I like the patio stones for the shape. Having the wider bottom lends to creating some fun and interesting little characters to hold open your doors for you. However, I feel obligated to point out to you that you can paint regular bricks to look like books, which is also super fun decor (at least if you are a book nerd like myself).

What else might a girl need for this little project? A girl will need some acrylic paints and sealer. I highly recommend getting a large bottle of them at a place like Blick Art Supplies or Michael’s as these bricks are pretty large and you will most likely need more than one coat of paint. A girl may also choose to have decorative items such as ribbons, scraps of fabric, googly eyes, and felt on hand as well. And finally a girl will need paint brushes in many varying sizes and a hot glue gun. (If making these for outdoor use, make sure to get outdoor paint and varnish.)

I will now stop talking like a Faceless Man and move on to describing all the fun things you might want to do with your concrete patio stones. Since they are so easy to make and don’t cost a fortune, you can potentially make one for every holiday! Below are examples of Easter, Christmas, and Halloween.

     

But you don’t just have to stick with holidays. Maybe you really really REALLY like chickens? Or dogs? Maybe you want something special for the door to your new baby’s nursery. Perhaps you live on a farm, or run a dog shelter, or a daycare? These three examples would work great!

     

To make these adorable decorations, start by washing your concrete patio stone with soap and water, then let it dry completely. This removes any dirt or dust that may prevent the paint from sticking to the stone. Once the stone is dry, paint on a layer of the sealer so that your paints don’t “soak” into the stone’s pores. Next, you’ll add your first coat of paint. Since the sealer isn’t going to block off those pores completely, this is why you may need multiple coats of paint for a nice, smooth finish. You don’t have to paint both sides of the stone but you can if you want to.

For your pattern, you can either use graphite paper to transfer a traced pattern onto your stone (you can even purchase patterns from sites like The Winfield Collection) or you can free-hand your own pattern onto the painted stone with a pencil (use light strokes!). Use your pattern to paint on the details for your doorstop. Faces, spots, hands and feet…whatever your pattern calls for that you don’t think you’ll use other mediums to depict. Example of other mediums; wooden cut-outs of hands and feet that can be affixed to the stone and give it more of a three-dimensional feel. Once all of that is dry, put another coat of your sealer on to protect the design. If you are using other mediums (such as those cut-outs or the googly eyes or pacifiers), use your hot glue gun to attach these items once the sealer is completely dry. And that, as they say, is that!

Baseball players, brides & grooms, cows, turtles, ducks, cats… you name it, you can probably paint a concrete patio stone to look like it. The heft of the stones makes them perfect for pretty much any door in your house (unless you live in a castle, like Hogwarts). As with most of my posts, these are great gifts for people as well. They’re functional and fun. They’re ‘fun’-ctional! (Get it? I know, I know… that was such a dad joke. My father would be proud.)

Happy painting, crafty people!

~Scribe Sarah~