DIY Ring Bowls.

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Hey Thursday Readers!

Still being in the throws of wedding season, I thought another DIY gift would be in order. You can make something like this for a shower before the wedding so that the couple can use it on the day of their wedding, or it can be a gift for after that they can leave by the sink to put rings in while we wash dishes. This project was taken from Intimate Weddings, so feel free to check the full tutorial here.

For this beautiful and simple project, you’ll need:

  • 795 gram package of White Oven Bake Clay (which should be available at any local craft store.
  • Letter Stamps (also should be easy to find at a craft store)
  • Rolling Pin
  • Bamboo stock or chopstick for to use as an awl to poke holes.
  • Lid to cut out the shape (like a lid for a tub of ice cream)
  • Fine sandpaper
  • Parchment paper.
  • A smallish oven safe bowl (like Pyrex)
  • Spray sealant and paint for finishing if you would like it.
  • A fabric doily

Your first step is to form your dough into a ball and place it on the parchment or silicone liner. Roll your dough out with your rolling pin until it is about 1/4 inch thick.

Place your fabric doily where you would like it to appear (you can put it in the centre or off to the side and either way it would look fabulous). Roll your rolling pin over top of it to press the design into the clay.

Use your lid to establish how big your bowl will be and to use it as a centre point to choose where to put your letters. You can do initials, or names, you could even do a small poem if your letters are small.

When you’re ready to cut the shape, peel off your doily to reveal the beautiful imprint.

Use your lid to cut the clay and form your circle. Save any excess clay for future projects.

After you remove the clay and the lid, you’ll have a circle that’s ready to be moulded into a bowl.

Use your awl tools to poke two holes at the top of the plate if you’re thinking of giving this as a ring bearer bowl at a wedding. You can omit these if it’s to be used as a ring dish at the sink or elsewhere.

Next you need to form your birds (if you’re making birds) or any other accents that you would like. If you’re making something you’d like to have stand on the side of the dish, use an existing dish to form the clay underneath them so they will be easy to adhere to the bowl.

Place your soft clay plate into the bottom of your oven safe bowl. Remember, it should be big enough to create a bowl, but not so small that your bowl is a teacup.

Place oven-safe bowl (and birds) on a cookie sheet and put into the oven for approximately 30 minutes (use the baking directions on the package, please!). When it’s done, remove from oven and let cool inside bowl for 20 mins. When cool, turn bowl over. It should pop right out.

Sand down the edges of your bowl until they are nice and smooth, as well as your birds. A sandpaper sponge would be ideal for this as opposed to regular old sandpaper. Use a little superglue to adhere your birds to the dish.

And you’re done! Well. If you’re inclined to paint your project, now would be the time, or add accents in paint or gold leaf or anything fancy like that. If you’re adding extra touches at the end, or if you’re going to be having this dish be for ring removal when you’re washing, I would make sure to use a good spray sealant so that the paint is sealed on, and the water can’t get in.

and you’re done! A beautiful gift, that takes just a little creativity.

Happy crafting!

~Megan


Put a Cork in it: DIY Etched Wine Cork Shadowbox

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Good morning Thursday Crafthackers.

I have a tutorial for you this morning on making your own etched shadow box from Sometimes Homemade. As an FYI, this isn’t a tutorial for creating a shadow box, but there are plenty of tutorials online. Just keep in mind if you’re making one, to leave an opening at the top to pop corks inside. This tutorial is going to focus on glass etching a box that has already been put together, and you can find them online or at craft stores. Just remember to look for a top loading shadow box, otherwise, you’ll need to drill a hole for the corks to be dropped in.

This is a great gift for any wine drinker, as not only does it preserve their great wine drinking memories, but it looks pretty awesome as a piece of art, too. You’ll need some supplies which you may have to visit a craft store for, anyway. You’ll need the top loading shadow box (make sure to get one big enough to hold a number of corks – 12×12 is a decent size), etching cream (Martha Stewart is easily found at craft and hobby stores, and might come with a brush), a medium sized craft paint brush, rubbing alcohol and cotton balls or cloth, and lastly, a stencil. You may also want a box cutter to cut out finer details on your stencil, depending on what you’ve chosen.

The stencil is the cool part. This is one that you can design yourself or print out something to personalize your gift. If it’s a wedding gift, you can monogram the box with the bride and groom’s initials, or give them a logo to go with their last name. You can do this freehand, or if you’re handy with the computer. You can also find lots of different printable stencils online, so make sure to do your research for what you’d prefer to do on this one.

For your first step, you should clean the glass with the rubbing alcohol and cotton, and allow to dry thoroughly. While it dries you can cut out your stencil and temporarily adhere it to the glass where you would like it to be.

Apply a thick and even layer of the etching cream to the glass that is exposed through the stencil. You are going to want it thick, so apply at least two thick layers, if not more. Only put the etching cream where you want the etching cream. You can’t really remove the effects once it gets put on the glass. After the cream is dry/set, about 15-20 minutes (see directions on your product) you can rinse away the residue and you should come out with etched glass underneath. If you’ve missed spots or it isn’t as etched as you like, you can go over your spots a second time and repeat the process.

And you’re done! A personalized, super cool way to give a really neat and affordable gift that is sure to impress.

Happy crafting!

~Megan


DIY: Aged Canvas Prints

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Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

I bring to you a lovely little tutorial. Given that we are coming into the season of weddings and birthdays, I though that this is something you can do to make a fairly impressive gift that is personalized and awesome. I found this tutorial at A Beautiful Mess and I love that you’re able to do this on a canvas. It’s super impressive!

You will need a few supplies. You’ll need a stretched canvas (8×10 is nice, and you can find these at craft and sometimes dollar stores), a gel medium (like Liquidex), a paint brush and a laser copy of the image you’re wanting to transfer. You’ll also need a spray bottle filled with water.  Your next step is to paint your canvas with the gel, and be generous. Next you will need to press the photo copy onto the canvas and let it dry for few hours, or overnight if you have the time.

After the image dries, use the spray bottle to get the top of the paper wet again, and then rub the surface with your fingers until the paper starts to come away. This will reveal your (mirrored) image underneath. Just be careful not to rub too vigorously, as it might remove the image rather than just the paper. Remove all the paper this way until you can see the whole image. Cover the canvas with an extra coat of the gel medium to seal and protect it.

Remember, that your image may not come out perfectly. In fact, it will probably have a number of spots where the image didn’t transfer exactly, but this is a project where rustic is the name of the game. So that’s kind of the idea. This is a great gift idea for any wedding, or any other occasion where pictures make a great gift but you want to give something just a little bit more.

Happy crafting!

~Megan

 


GenCon Classes

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GenCon Classes go live on Sunday for sign ups!  GenCon is the original longest running gaming convention in the world and it happens in Indianapolis August 17-20.  They are unique by allowing you to pick and choose your classes and events ahead of time by securing tickets.  No waiting in lines!

Nicole, Toni, and Marc will be at GenCon again this year and Toni and Nicole will be teaching classes again!

Toni will be teaching two English Paper Piecing classes.

 

English Paper Piecing Quilt Technique

Description: Learn to English Paper Piece, or get help with an existing project you are working on. In this class we will start with the basic hexagon flower using scraps of colorful and character fabrics (like Dr Who or Comic Books).

Class Length: 2 hours

Date/ Time /Game ID:

  1. Thursday, August 17th/ 10:00am /SPA17103527
  2. Friday, August 18th/ 10:00am /SPA17103528
  3. Saturday, August 19th/ 9:00am /SPA17103529

Cost: $18

English Paper Piece a Catan Board Quilt

Description: Learn to English Paper Piece by creating a small version of the Catan board, 9″ wide to be exact. In this class we will start with the basic hexagon shape and add on triangles (for sand) around the edges.  Options for finishing your miniature quilt will be discussed.

Class Length: 2 hours

Date/ Time /Game ID:

  1. Friday, August 18th/ 7:00pm /SPA17103534
  2. Sunday, August 20th/ 12:00pm /SPA17103535

Cost: $34

Nicole will be teaching Crochet classes again.

Crochet a Hogwarts Infinity Scarf

Description: Learn the basic crochet techniques in scarf making along with custom techniques for making an almost seamless infinity scarf. Materials will be provided, but if you have different colors/hooks you’d prefer to use feel free to bring them. Novice and first time crocheters will most likely not finish during class hours, but tools will include a pattern to take home so that everyone can finish on their own time.

Class Length: 2 hours

Date/ Time /Game ID:

  1. Thursday, August 17th/ 12:00pm /SPA17103530
  2. Friday, August 18th/ 11:00am /SPA17103531
  3. Saturday, August 19th/ 2:00pm /SPA17103532

Cost: $28

So head over to GenCon and sign up for some classes!


Cookie Ring Tutorial

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Hi there and happy Wednesday! This is Kim with Fantastical Menagerie. I wanted to share this quick and simple project with you. It’s a cookie ring, using polymer clay for the cookies.

What you’ll need for this project is:

  • Premo clay in ecru and burnt sienna
  • an adjustable ring base of your choice.
  • A straight blade. You can use a knife, a tissue blade, or whatever you are comfortable with.
  • Somethjng for texture, either a texture mold or even some wrinkled up foil.
  • A miniature plate. You can check the miniature section of your hobby store, or even a toy store. It need to be oven safe to 275 degrees F.
  • Adhesive.

Steps:

  • Condition your clay by kneading it. Separate out three pea sized balls of ecru clay.
  • Flatten the balls, leaving them a little rounded like real cookies would be after baking.
  • Using your texture stamp or crumpled foil, add some texture to the cookies. 
  • Make some very tiny balls of your sienna clay. These are your chocolate chips. Randomly place them on your cookies, flattening the balls as you place them. 
  • Optional- add some bronze pearlX powder to simulate baking color. You can also do an acrylic wash with brown after baking instead.
  • Using adhesive, attach the cookies to the plate and bake in your oven. Premo bakes in an oven at 275 degrees F, and I would bake your plate for 30 minutes. After cooling, it can be attached using the same adhesive to your ring base.

If you don’t like rings, it can be done as a pendant, or even earrings.


DIY with Scrapbook Paper

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Hello Thursday Readers,

One thing I never got into but always sort of wished had the time for was scrapbooking. I love all the pretty things that you can do with it and the papers, the lush papers are amazing and there are some pretty easy DIY projects that you can do for your home or for a gift that would look just amazing. This is a very quick one, and doesn’t require a lot of time or skill to do, just the materials. I am actually going to combine two DIY ideas from a lovely person I have featured here before called the Nomadic Decorator.

For this DIY you’ll just need an adhesive like Mod Podge (though she actually recommends Aleene’s Tacky Glue instead, because it is less wet and will help the paper stay flat. She also recommends trying a spray adhesive). You will need pieces of amazing 12×12 scrap paper – and the heavier weights and thicker papers are recommended.You will also need some 12×12 wooden panels, which you might find at your local craft stores. at a local hardware store, or  you can order them online at places like this. Though this DIY is very simple, your materials and technique are what will really make it pop on your wall.

All you need to do is paint the sides of your exposed wood, and then brush a layer of glue onto the panel. Place the scrapbook paper on the glue and then use a ruler, a credit card or really anything with a sharp, flat edge to start from the centre and work your way outwards to press out the bubbles that may have formed under your craft paper. You can seal it if you’d like, and you can seal it very well with an outdoor sealant if you’d like to decorate an outdoor (but not too exposed to the elements) place. And that’s it! You can make as many as you want to cover however big a space you’d like. I love that these are so easy and that you can do this to suit your style.

There’s an extra step that you can do if you’d like to dress it up and make these a little bit more lush.You can use this other tutorial to stencil your scrapbook hangings to bring a little metalic or whatever other color you’d like onto your scrapbook hangings. This new tutorial shows you how to make one bigger hanging but I love the idea of using a stencil on a couple of these smaller ones as part of a whole to give a little extra pop. I especially love the metallic.

You’ll need a few extra tools – a stencil brush and stencil, paint and a bowl (with a paper towel) for blotting so you don’t goop all over the stencil. If you need help with stenciling, there are plenty of ideas here. Basically, I would recommend applying some beautiful stencils (that you can order online or find at a craft store) after everything is dry, but before you seal your work. I would also recommend doing a couple pieces as an eyecatcher rather than doing each individual square, unless you’re planning on following the tutorial to create one big one.

I hope you enjoyed this simple but really lovely and lush marriage of these two tutorials. I love, love, love simple tutorials that look so much more involved than they are for a really impressive result.

Enjoy, and happy crafting!

~ Megan


Tinted Decorative Glass

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Hey there Thursday readers!

Well, where we’ve just had Pi day, and it is indeed March, it’s snowy here, where I live, and it doesn’t look like the snow is going to stop anytime soon. Does that mean we shouldn’t be looking at spring focused DIY? Not at all! What better way than to do a craft that can be used for flowers and decor or for lining window ledges to get a smattering of colour. I am bringing for you a super easy tutorial for making tinted glass. Now, usually you see this kind of thing done in the form of beach glass, where glass jars are done in an aqua colour. This one is a little different because the tints used are really nice and vintage – like antique medicine bottles. I have used the tutorial from Fancy that Design House, and of course there many tutorials floating around, but as I said, I loved the colours that were chosen for these jars, and I love how easy it is.

I love the look of these and they’re so easy and can be used as really beautiful accents to any rustic decor, or to sit on windowsills to tint the light coming in. I also love that you can just save your old pasta, jam, mason or any jars you fancy to use for this, so it can be done on the cheap.

You will need some supplies, but they are minimal and you might just have them laying around the house. If you don’t, Mod Podge (or a similar craft adhesive) can be bought at almost any  craft store, and then the others you can pick up at any grocery store. Just make sure that outside of the jars, mod podge and food colouring that you also supply yourself with mixing bowls, some newspaper to cover your work area and to line a baking sheet (rather than using rather expensive parchment paper), a baking sheet, paper towels, and a stir stick or spoon. You’ll also be heat blasting them in an oven, so, you’ll need access to one of those too.

 

Your first step is to mix Mod Podge, water and food colouring in a small mixing bowl. For just one jar, you’ll need about 1 tbsp of mod podge with about 1/2 tbsp of water, so depending on how many jars you will be doing, you’ll need to bulk up your recipe as necessary. In this bowl you’ll also want to mix your food colouring. Depending on the colours that you’re wanting to do, you can start with a more green colour, and add drops of food colouring as you go to give you variations in your colouring so that you don’t have to make separate batches of the goo to have different colours. Just add a drop of whichever colour moves you after each one. Though the goo might look gross, rest assured when it dries it will be a glorious antiqued browish colour.

You will also need to prep a baking sheet by lining it with newspaper. You’re now ready to pour the gross looking goo mixture into your jar and rotate it around so that the inside gets completely covered. Be ready with a paper towel when you get to the mouth of the jar, to catch any dribbles as you reach the edge, and make sure that all the glass is covered or you’ll have a bald spot.

Put your covered jar upside down on the covered baking sheet and repeat the steps above if you’re doing more jars. Remember to change up your colour mix a little! You want to let your jars sit upside down for about an hour so that any extra goo can run down the sides and exit. This will also help prevent streaks.

In the meantime, prepare another baking sheet by lining it with wax paper ( though I don’t see why you wouldn’t be able to use parchment if it’s on hand, or even foil). When your waiting period is up, turn your jars right side up and put them on the newly prepared sheet. You might have leftover goo puddles, but that’s okay, just bundle them up and throw away the newspaper. Put your tray with the jars right side up in a warm oven (225 degrees F) for about 45 minutes. If you check after 45 minutes and notice streaks, leave them in a little longer. When your time is up and you don’t have streaks, remove from the oven and give them plenty of time to cool.

There’s just a few things to remember. Some streaks will be inevitable, especially the darker you go. These jars aren’t great for water, as Mod Podge is water soluble. So if you insist on putting things in there that require water – you could try putting a coat of water resistant sealant, but there’s no guarantee. Rather than fresh flowers, try getting some silk foliage, or dried flowers in the fall. My mother uses delicate branches from bushes in her garden and they look fabulous.

Happy crafting!

~ Megan

 


Playing with Log Cabin Blocks

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This video appeared in my feed the other day from Fons & Porter and I loved it.  Toby Lamb Lischko takes Sara Gallegos through all the ways a Log Cabin block can be laid out and used.

Log Cabin Quilt Block Play with Toby Lischko

Log Cabin quilt layouts made easier with pointers from quilter Toby Lamb Lischko and host Sara Gallegos @Sew Positively Sara! Here are some extra tips that didn't make it into the Love of Quilting episode, A Formal Affair. Baby Lock USA Koala Studios APQS Paintbrush Studio, a division of Fabri-Quilt, Inc.

Posted by Fons & Porter's Love of Quilting on Friday, February 17, 2017

I love Log Cabin quilts but the blocks can seem hard to make since the pieces are so small.  They are surprisingly easy though.  Here are some great patterns and resources if you want to make a Log Cabin quilt yourself.

A free tutorial for a 12″ Block.

A free tutorial for a 14″ Block.

One of my favorite patterns is the Quilt in a Day Log Cabin.

Or if you want to be even more adventurous join the Fons and Porter mailing list and they will give you an ebook with traditional Log Cabin quilt blocks, as well as variations, such as Chevron and Courthouse Steps quilt blocks.

Have you made a Log Cabin quilt?  Share it with us!

-Toni

 

 

 


DIY: Rustic Magnetic Knife Rack

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Hello Thursday Readers,

Here’s a nifty little tutorial I found for something I’ve always had a soft spot for: a magnetic knife rack. Now of course, if you’re going to do this tutorial, you’ll need to ensure safety first, so when choosing a place to mount this beauty, you will need to make sure that it is out of the reach of any little hands, and not in any danger of being knocked off accidentally. The original tutorial for this was posted here, if you’d like to visit the source.

You will, of course, need some tools and materials. You’ll need a wood board 15 inches by 3.5 inches. You can reclaim wood, or even use driftwood. You can pick it up at the hardware store, sand and stain it yourself. It all depends on how you want it to look. You’ll also need some sandpaper, a tape measure, trigger clamps (these are optional) a power drill with a 1 inch round Forstner bit, 1 inch round ceramic magnets (54 of them), some gel adhesive, a 5/32 drill bit, and 2.5 inch wall mounting screws (two of them).

Your fist step is to measure and cut the board to your desired size. For this particular tutorial though, it was made to be 15 inches long. If you’re buying wood at a hardware store, they will generally cut wood to your preferred size for no extra cost. You will need to clean and sand the board to your desired finished. As I said, if you want to apply stain and sealer, now is the time. Decide which side of the board you’d like to display and then turn it over to measure the back where you will be inlaying the magnets.

Allow one inch on each end of the board for drilling the wall screws into and then mark two straight lines 2.5 inches apart. This will help you line up your two rows of magnets. On each of the lines, mark nine points that are 1.5 inches apart, and you’re ready to drill. Your goal is to have two central rows of nine holes that measure half an inch apart.

It is now time to make the holes so you can inlay your magnets. Use your Forstner drill bit, which will drill a solid round well into the wood. The key to having a good, strong magnetic hold is to get the magnet as close to the front of the wood as possible, so you want to drill as far as you can without drilling through the surface. You might want to practice this a couple times before you begin for realsies, and when you find the right depth for the drill, you can put a piece of painter’s tape on your drill to mark where you should stop. This will take the guesswork out of your drilling.

You can use trigger clamps to hold the wood in place to allow for more overall control during this step. Then you can drill your 18 holes (two rows of nine) as close to the surface as possible, leaving about 1/8 inch of wood where the magnets will sit.

Now is the time if you’d like to have starter holes for your screws in the sides. Measure and drill a starter so you don’t have to guess where the screw will be going.  So for the strongest hold, stack three 1 inch round ceramic magnets together. Use your adhesive to glue your magnets to the back of the board. It isn’t necessary to glue the magnets to each other… they’ll stick to themselves.

Use your wall mounting screws to mount the rack in place on your wall, and then you’re ready to display all your wonderful knives!

 

I hope that you enjoyed this tutorial. I thought it was really neat, and such a cool way to display some pretty amazing sliceware.

Happy Crafting!

~ Megan


DIY: Stenciled Glass Tabletop

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Good morning Thursday readers!

I found something that’s super cool that I thought I should share with you, for anyone who has a table with a glass top inset who wants to spruce it up.  I am using this tutorial from Nomadic Decorator as a how to, and you can go to her website to check out the full tutorial for this and other really neat ideas.

Now that you’ve seen it, don’t you want to make it? You will need some tools and supplies for this project. Obviously, your clear glass surface (that has been cleaned with glass cleaner), a ruler, a stencil of your choice, stencil brushes and stencil cream paint. You can see the specifics of brand and paint colours in the original tutorial. There are paints that are designed for glass, though you can be a little less concerned about that if you are painting the underside of a table that won’t get bumped, scratched or cleaned. Which you use is up to you though.

With stenciling on glass, you need to paint your colours in reverse – so your background should be the last thing you paint. You will also want to make sure that your glass is clean so that dust, fingerprints or anything else won’t be forever painted onto the glass. So the first step is to do any foreground detail you would like first, and this blogger did copper specks all over, so she did that first by flicking a brush with paint on it to get a very fine spray.

The next step is to use the ruler to find the centre of the table, and put the centre of your stencil there. After your stencil is where it should be you can use one paint colour or a combination of hues to paint your design. Just remember to use your stencil brush properly, so rather than brushing in strokes, you will be tapping the brush up and down onto the stencil, so that the paint doesn’t run, or move the stencil or have a harsh blending of colours. This will almost be like painting with a sponge. Remember that you can have the paint be as thick or thin as you choose, and this technique will allow for a smooth transition between multiple colours. This tutorial mixes 3 different metallic shades, but use whichever colours speak to your soul. Just make sure your design paint is thick enough that you won’t see your background colour through it. You might need a couple of layers for this.

Your last step is to remove the stencil and use your background colour to paint over the entire stencil, making sure to get to all the edges. Again, you might want to do this in a couple coats to make sure that you get good coverage. You can also use a bigger stencil brush to speed the process along.

Though I can’t take credit for it, I thought that this was just a beautiful way to give new life to old pieces of furniture, and gives an option to those who are shopping through second hand and vintage stores a new idea for how to turn a regular coffee table (or something larger…) into something with a definite wow factor.

Happy crafting!

~Megan