Sewing with Scraps – Sandwich Wrap

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A bit of a step back in difficulty from last week, and yet this one is slightly more annoying to make (more on that in a bit, lol). So we go thru a lot of plastic baggies for conventions and I thought this pattern would be great to help reduce on that waste! Not to mention you can claim a fabric as ‘yours’ so no more need to write a name on bags either! 😀

These are plastic sandwich wraps from the ladies at Chica and Jo. Now, right off the bat, I’m gonna admit that I changed one main aspect about this pattern. While it walks you thru the steps very nicely for how to make fused plastic from extra plastic shopping bags…none of my attempts really ended up with something I liked. We also have been using reusable shopping bags here for years so I didn’t have much to work with. Instead I just bought some plastic from Joanns for like $3 a yard. Totally worth it.

Okay, so it’s hard to see since my plastic is clear, but want to cut a 14″x14″ square of the fabric and a 12″x12″ square of the plastic. With wrong side facing you for the fabric, lay the plastic on top; centering it to give a 1″ border all around. Now the next step is hard to explain and I couldn’t be bothered to take pics of it, but basically you have to do a double fold over all around the border and pin it in place. See the Chica and Jo site for great photos to walk you thru it. I personally used my iron to hold down the first 1/2″ fold to make my pinning life easier, but you do what works for you.

With all your pins in place, you simply sew around the boarder to attach these two. I recommend sewing as close to the fold as you feel comfortable to reduce the size of the hangover for your finished piece. Once that’s done you just need to add velcro; which is used to hold your wrap in place. You’ll need 2 pieces total: a 1″ long and a 2″ long piece. Now the only velcro I have is 2″ wide, so I just did two 1″x2″ pieces. You’ll be attaching them in the corners with 2 on the inside, and 2 on the outside.

Once they’re on, that’s it! You have a finished wrap! The plastic will make it very easy to clean up as you can just wipe off and dressing/condiments or even toss the whole piece in the wash for bad stains. I wouldn’t recommend putting it in the dryer (cause plastic), but just let it air dry by laying flat instead.

Overall I give this pattern 4/5 bobbins. It seems like it can work great, and I look forward to giving it a try at C2E2 this weekend, but until I do I can’t say as to how well it performs. I may come back and give it 5/5 if it amazing, lol.


Sewing with Scraps – Earbud Pouch

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Okay, so I probably queued these out of order as this is the pattern I learned how to make a tab from which I put in the tissue pattern for last week, but I was trying to do these in increasing order of difficulty sooooo……sorry. XD

Anyway, this is the first pattern I found using the scraps and what made me dig to find more as I thought that was something useful in daily life. The pattern comes from Dog Under my Desk and it’s probably one of my favorites from how high quality it looks when you’re done.

Materials needed were about a 6″x7″ piece of fabric for both inner and outer fabrics along with the same amount for interfacing (midweight again). A keyring (or hook) and a 5″ or longer plastic zipper.

You’ll have to print out the provided template, but it prints true to form so as long as you have a printer you’re good to go. Cut your fabric per the pattern requirements while your iron warms up. Then apply interfacing to the circle and 2 half circles for the fabric you want showing. Now, I’m not even going to try and write up how to explain adding the zipper cause I’ll screw it up, lol, but that where you’ll start by layering the half circles on one side (curved ends facing the zipper with right sides of the fabric facing each other), sewing, pressing, and then repeating on the other side. You’ll end up with something like this.

Next you’ll make the tab and sew it at the top of the circle edge where the zipper pulled from. I accidentally did this at the bottom on my first one. So learn from my mistakes, lol. The tab should be laying on the zipper track towards the inside of circle when you do it.

Now, making sure you zipper is in the middle of your circle, layer the circles with right sides out -not touching- and lay it on top of the zipper (yes you’re covering the zipper. This is why it needs to be half way down so you can reach inside). The the fabric you want on the outside should be touching when you do this. So for me, zelda fabric touching zelda fabric and green on the top.

Start anywhere you like, but I did it at the tab on the top. I also recommend do a few back and forth stitches here to reinforce that tab. You’ll want a 3/8″ seam on this one, so give yourself extra room and if it starts to bunch/pucker then stop sewing, lift the foot and smooth things out before continuing. Once you’ve sewn the edge, you also want to pinking shears to trim the edge. I used scissors my first time to clip the circle and the shears work waaaay better. This is why you had to leave so much space for your seam. Once you’re done just turn it inside out and ta da! You’ve got a pouch!

I really like how this looked and part of that admittedly is cause I did fussy cutting to get the image centered just how I wanted. It’s really just a nice little case and I may even make some as gifts for my family. 🙂 Overall I’d rate this a 5/5 bobbins. Great little pattern, but take your time and follow the step by step info at Dog Under my Desk and not my general ramblings.

 


Sewing with Scraps – Tissue Pouch

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In case it wasn’t obvious with the first 2 scrap patterns I reviewed, I was looking for things I would personally make use of. This will of course vary for everyone, but I just figured I’d let you all know my mind set when I was finding projects so you have an idea of what’s to come. Today’s pattern is a travel tissue pouch that I had to dig up in a web archive as the original site long gone. You can find that archived pattern here, but I’m going to include more info since I don’t know how long that archive will last. I recommend saving the page if you want to follow the original pattern while you work. I even made into a pdf. The original credit for this pattern goes to So Sew Something.

So first you’ll need to gather your materials All you need for this is just 2 pieces of scrap fabric measuring 6″x7″ and sewing thread. I decided to use a little extra fabric and add a loop so I can hang this from a purse or something in the future. I have it pinned just to mark placement as this does not get sewn on until much later. It’s made from a 2″ wide and 3″ long piece that I folded into quarters (with edges folded to meet in the middle and then folded in half) and then sewed around the edge of it to keep it together.

Just like last week’s pattern, you’ll want to place the right (aka printed) side of the fabric together and sew a 1/4″ seam around the edge. Start on the 7″ edge and leave a 3″ gap so you can turn it inside out. Once you’ve turned it inside out, push out all the corners (use a stick to help if needed) and press it with a hot iron.

Now, with the fabric you want showing on top, fold the edges in so they meet evenly in the middle. (NOTE: If you want to add a loop like I did simply place the loop inside the pouch with the edge just visible at the top. I recommend using a pin to keep it in place until you sew it.) Yes this makes it seem like it will be inside, but it will not.

Do another 1/4″ seam on the top and bottom now. This will be hard to do on the top if you added a loop since you’re going through so many layers. You may want a jean needle if you worry about the normal one breaking. I only use jean needles cause I mainly use my machine to sew through yarn and velcro, lol. Anyway, once you’ve done your seam on both edges, turn your piece inside out once more, using your fingers to pop the corners out as you do.

And you’re done! Now you’ll see the little line on mine at the opening but if you had your opening on the 7″ side you won’t have that. I did mine on the 6″ side for this first batch like the pattern said to do, and then had to add these lines to close up the hole. Hopefully my suffering will save you trouble in the end. 🙂 I also  have my edges over lapping slightly to help cover the opening a bit since I won’t always have a pack of tissues and may just fold some up and put them in. You can add things like buttons to help keep it closed, but that’s beyond my skill right now, lol. Overall I think this is another great easy pattern. Probably on par with the cord keeper one from last week. You don’t need interfacing, but I know I messed up on the forgetting to turn something inside out again step so just go slow until you get into the groove of the pattern. I also made it hard by adding the tab (which I messed up like 3 times, lol) so don’t to that until you’ve made it once the normal way unless you’re more skilled then I am, lol. I’d give it 5/5 bobbins again. Great little pattern.


Sewing with Scraps – Cord Wraps

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So the scrap sewing pattern this week was another one that was picked cause I needed something to manage the spaghetti factory of cables I have collected, and comes from Leafy Treetop. I recently gave my sister my old laptop case since she needed one for work and mine was just being used to hold all my various charging cables as I no longer have a laptop. This left me with the issue of about 10 cables that now suddenly needed a new home and to be organized. Time to put that scrap to work!

The time for this was much faster then the mousepad last week since I had no drying time, and once I knew what I was doing, I had these setup assembly line style to sew up and save time. You’ll need 2 scraps that are about 3″x7″ and interfacing (midweight) for each cord wrap, along with a bit of velcro. I buy velcro by the giant spool for my chain chomp plush, so I just cut some off to whatever size I needed but I think anything 1″x1″ or there abouts will work.

Using the template, I cut out the fabric needed for the first few (and then more later cause I didn’t make enough, lol). I decided to frame the images on some of the fabric (known as fussy cutting) so I used more scrap then I had to as a result, but that was my choice so it didn’t bother me toooooo much. Once everything was cut, I ironed the interfacing on the back (or wrong) side of the fabric I wanted to have showing. Then I placed the 2 fabrics, right side facing together, next to my machine to sew.

I sewed around the edge without pins (cause this was so small) about 1/4″ from the edge. I have a special foot that Toni suggested to me for this exact purpose and it really helped a lot. You have to leave about a 2-3″ gap in your sewing so you can turn your piece inside out and then iron and sew around the edge once more.

Now that the body is done, you simply place and sew the velcro on as you desire. the first few I did I used vertical strips just on the ends, but I wanted to be able to tighten it more so for the second batch I had the velcro go horizontal on the body. It does mean the design is covered more, but I know the kind of jostling my cords will take and just felt like the initial batch won’t stay in the keeper as well. Time will tell if I’m wrong about this, lol.

As you can see from this picture of my first batch, I forgot to sew the right sides together on one. Opps! I just said screw it and I’m living with it, but if you were making these as gifts or for someone else, then maybe don’t work at like 10pm like I did, lol. In the end I really liked this pattern. It was very easy to follow (lots of pictures) and a great introduction to interfacing if you’ve never used it before. The pattern is simple and besides the small change in velcro placement I’m very happy with everything. I’d give it a 5/5 bobbins. Highly recommend it.


New needle on the market!

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One of the things I LOVE about the Chrome line of needles is the ability to prevent stickiness building up on the needle.  Schmetz has announced a new needle that does the same thing but in their regular line!

There’s a Stealthy NEW SCHMETZ Needle in Town . . .

It Won’t Leave You in a Sticky Situation!

Tired of gumming up needles with stubborn adhesives? Complaining about missed stitches and thread breakage caused by adhesives? Users of adhesive stabilizers, temporary spray adhesives, or self-adhesive hook and loop tapes can now rejoice!


SCHMETZ Super Nonstick Needle

Slippery surface ensures less “goo” sticks to the needle!


Features

  • Non-stick coating of NIT (Nickel-Phosphor-PTFE).
  • Extra-large eye suitable for embroidery work.
  • Eye corresponds to a needle two sizes larger (i.e., the 70/10 NonStick eye is similar to size 90/14 Universal eye).
  • Distinctive scarf and special eye prevents skipped stitches.
  • Slightly rounded point provides trouble-free sewing on most materials.
  • Strong conical blade reinforcement easily handles thick fabrics like denim.
  • Five (5) needles per card.

Uses

  • Machine embroidery
  • Hook and loop tapes
  • General sewing

So look for this great new needle at your local sewing or quilting store!

-Toni


Sewing with Scraps – Mouse Pad

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As Toni can verify, I’ve had a very cautious approach to using a sewing machine. I took classes in school sure, but I was already very good at sewing by hand even then and the machines were so old that half to time they didn’t work. So while I’ve learned a few things and how newer models work, I would still default to hand sewing for years. Well I decided to change all that starting a few weekends back. My sister is a fashion major and, as my birthday gift, offer to sew me a new purse as long as I had the pattern and materials ready for her. After she was done (and it’s super cute) I had about half a yard of scraps that I didn’t want to just toss. My thriftiness wouldn’t allow it! So I scoured the internet for ideas that I could use these bits and pieces for. I found tons of ideas but only about 8 appealed to me. For the next few weeks I’m going to highlight each one I picked, how easy it was for a beginner, and how I feel the final product turned out. Today I started with what seemed to be the simplest of the lot, a mousepad.

Now I’ve been considering buying a mousepad for my desk for a few months as my mouse has worn thru some of the top finish in spots, but it’s started catching on those so the timing here was almost perfect. It would also allow my to make something that would fit the very unusual size I would need (10″ by 6″) for my small desk space. Following the instructions from How Joyful, I gathered my materials.

What you see here is my cut fabric, some dollar store shelf liner, and a paper towel. You basically sandwich these together (fabric, liner, paper towel) and pin in place before sewing – if needed. The paper towel is used to keep the needle from sticking to the rubber bottom of the non-slip liner, so you could use something like tissue paper instead if you don’t have any paper towels on hand.

After you sew around the edge, you then turn it over and slowly rip off the paper towel. Doing the edges first makes removing the middle much, much easier. Try and get as much off as you can since you’ll want the rubber of bottom mat to be able to smoothly touch the surface.

Now for the time consuming part. You flip it back over and apply Mod Podge to the fabric side in a nice even coat. You’ll want 2-3 coats of modge podge total and it’s an hour to dry between coats, so be sure to set it up on some parchment paper or surface you can easily clean. I did my first coat at night and then the second in the morning, but you do with what works for your schedule. Now if yours is anything like mine, the edges started to curl during the drying and I wasn’t having that. I recommend taking a hot dry iron once it’s fully dry (mine was set to cotton since that was my fabric), place parchment paper over the mouse pad and then iron it to fix this.

Here’s my mouse pad at it’s new home. I also trimmed the edges of extra fabric/rubber pad so it looked nice and neat after ironing it. So what did I think of it in the end? Well, there’s a few things I’d change but overall it’s a great easy pattern for a beginner. I don’t like how the surface feels for mine, but that could be on the type of modpodge I used, and it’s much thinner then a normal mouse pad so maybe adding some interfacing on the back of the fabric would fix that issue. Other then that, only time will tell if it holds up to daily use. I rate it 4/5 bobbins. Good and easy, but needs tweaking for personal preference.


A Bit of the Bun

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Happy Sunday, all!

I promised bunnies, so it’s time to make good! Since I’ve been trying to expand my sewing experience lately, most of these DIYs are needle and thread type things. The first of which is a super cute set of bunny hot pads from So Sew Easy:

What could they be taking out of the oven? Could it be carrot cake???

We get to play with InsulBrite AND apply some applique techniques? Awesome! We’ve already got the sewing machine out, so how about some super adorbs carrot treat bags for the little bunnies in the family from Make It Love It:

Perfect for jelly beans or my personal favorite, peanut butter/chocolate eggs.

I was always obsessed by small drawstring bags to carry around my “treasures” when I was a kid, so these seem like just the thing. Ok, so how about a little hand sewing? I do, seriously, mean a little – this darling small felted bunny from Lia Griffith made me squee:

With his tiny toe beans and bitty carrot, just too sweet!

That little guy would be so charming topping off a basket or just hanging around a Spring bouquet, wouldn’t he? Still in the mood for cute and small? Great! Because I found this delightful little tutorial on how to make a fluffy little bunny pom pom on the Pom Maker blog:

They’re so fluffy!

I really can’t get over how boop-able those noses are! Ok, ok, back to the list. The last thing today is super easy and doesn’t take any specialty materials to craft so you probably have all the things already to make these origami bunny bookmarks from Red Ted Art:

Great for holding your place when re-reading Peter Cottontail or any other bunny faves!

I’m quite certain the pattern can be adapted to other woodland critters. There you have it – quite a bit of buns to go around! Spring is just around the corner, I can feel it!

Stay crafty!

~Laura


Art Therapy and Dealing with SAD

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Hey all!

Long time, no type. For real, though, I’m sure some of the usual suspects are wondering where I disappeared to for a couple of Sundays there. The truth is a combination of things but it all boils down to one big, annoying, unfortunately inevitable occurrence for me: seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder or SAD as it is generally called, is essentially seasonal depression. It’s something that I struggle with at about this time every year and it sucks. There are definitely some activities that can help alleviate some of the symptoms, not the least of which is art therapy. The best kinds of projects for this purpose are those that are bright and full of Spring colors as well as being something that you (for once) make for yourself. I’ve rounded up some great Spring-y things to make to hopefully get us passed these dismal and cold days.

To start, let’s turn something usually associated with the snow and cold into pretty flowers with this tutorial from A Fanciful Twist:

So bright and beautiful! Just make sure you aren’t using the cinnamon scented ones.

Just a bit of paint and a sealer and we have pinecones transformed into zinnias! Place a bowl of them somewhere in the house to give it a pop of color and hopefully bring in a hint of Spring. We can also combat some of the doldrums of late Winter with the scents of the upcoming thaw. This DIY Lavender sachet tutorial from Live Simply is just the thing:

Also great for using up some scrap fabric!

If you have a favorite scent, almost any potpourri can be used as a stuffing. Put them in your dresser or in the pockets of any favorite pieces of clothing in your closet for a reminder that the dark doesn’t last forever. Ok, so now we have something pretty to look at, something great to smell, but what about something to make us feel better? I don’t know about you but winter also dries out my skin like crazy. Scribe Sarah’s been providing a bunch of fantastic DIY body care recipes so you can certainly prowl the archives for relaxing (and fragrant) bath salts or face masks. I, however, am talking about a great DIY body butter recipe (also by Live Simply, funnily enough):

If you have a collection of essential oils, this is the place to let them shine, so to speak.

Body butter is rich and lasts much longer than what we would consider traditional lotion. I love to customize scents and have some kind of control over the ingredients I’m smearing on my sensitive skin. Lastly, how about something to just lift your spirits? Something whimsical and fun like this simply adorable fleece unicorn pillow tutorial from Bugaboo City:

I guarantee this will be appearing on our own couch in due time.

If only to remind yourself that you, too, are one of a kind and fabulous, you need this in your dwelling. Hopefully one of these little projects will start to lift you out of the funk. If not, there are actually some very practical tips for fighting the effects of SAD, the best of which is purchasing a lamp made just for this purpose. SADlamps.org has a wonderful list of comparisons for effectiveness and cost. If you still find yourself feeling down in the dumps around this time, I highly recommend a trip to your doctor/therapist. This is a real issue that affects many people during this time period and it could even require some Vitamin D supplements so don’t wait to find some help! For more info on SAD symptoms and treatments, please check out this article by the National Institute of Mental Health.

Now, to wrap up, I did promise a tutorial some time back and now that I’ve taken some steps to combat my SAD, it will appear in the near future. Until then, expect some bunny laced posts since Easter is fast approaching.

Stay crafty!

~Laura

 


February Fab Hop Shop

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Have you discovered the Fab Hop Shop yet?

FabShop Hop

 

The concept behind our virtual shop hop is exactly the same as taking a fabric shopping trip by car. On our “virtual” shop hop, however, you’ll leave the car in the garage and can even shop in your jammies! You will have a month to get around to over 100 of the sites to find the “YouFoundIt” Bunnies to qualify to win prizes. There are 12 hops scheduled for 2018.

Tour all the shops participating in the February FabShop Hop!At each site, search for the white bunny with the red and pink background that says ‘You Found It!’ February 1-28, 2018. When you find it; click on the image and complete the prize registration page – enter your email address and click the “register for prizes” button. Once you have done that you will receive an email confirmation that you successfully registered at that site. Then continue shopping on that site or hop to the next one on the List of Shops.

The best part of the Shop Hop other than winning prizes?  The free quilt patterns!

Happy Hopping!


Pattern Release Day: Light Mage

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Tuesday was pattern release day for Quiltoni! We would like to introduce you to Light Mage.

Heal and Protect your comrades using White Magic with the Light Mage.

Basic Skills Necessary:
Use a Sewing Machine
Use a Fabric Cutter or Rotary Cutter and Straight Edge
1/4″ seam

Learn how to sew strips, nest seams, and piece efficiently to save time.

Sizing / Finished Measurements:
40″ by 50″

Materials:
1/4 Yard Tan
1/4 Yard Brown
3/4 Yard Black
1 1/4 Yard Light Blue
1/2 Yard Red
3/4 Yard White

You Will Also Need:
Sewing Machine & Preferred Thread
Rotary Cutter & Straight Edge
Pins
Scissors
Iron & Ironing Board

You do not need knowledge of making quilts, you just need to know how to use a sewing machine! So take a look at Light Mage and may your heals be beneficial to your party.