DIY Colourful Suncatchers

Posted on

Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

Today is a special post because this is my last post as a single lady. In fact, I’ll be getting married tomorrow! So you’ll have to forgive the simplicity of the post but I wanted to find something colourful, beautiful and easy to match my mood. So I’ve got a really easy sun catcher tutorial that is just so cheerful that I couldn’t resist. The original tutorial is from Life In the Nuthouse, which can be found here with all the photos you might need.

So I love that this can be made into an upcycling project as you will need plastic cups. Look for ones that are clear and colourful, rather than just the red solo cups. So if you’re at birthday parties through the summer, maybe save some, or you can buy some at the varying places around that carry plastic cups :).  Look for type 6 recycling plastic as those will be the ones that will shrink down. You can buy ones for you to use or you can buy some to bring to parties and then reuse them.

First, you will need to start with clean cups and cut off the base.

Next you will need to punch two holes across from each other.

Preheat your oven to 250 Farenheit, and line your pans with parchment paper. Place the cups top side down. They won’t really melt too much, but leave a little room between them so they can collapse. If they aren’t completely flat, use a spatula right after you remove them from the oven to flatten them. If your oven is hot, it will only take 2 minutes for them to melt. Scoop them off and let them cool either on a cool pan or if you have a granite counter top, you can let them cool on there. Don’t use cookie racks or you’ll have indents.

When they’re cooled. use some string/yarn/fishing line to string them up with an outer circular layer and an inner one.

For the top of the chandelier, you can use any round plate but the packing boxes from clocks from Ikea can be repurposed and painted. Since the clock used was octagonal, 8 strands of discs made sense, as well as an inner ring of 8 for a total of 16 strands. The outer ring has 5 discs (one of each color) and the inner ring has 7 discs, so that they would hang down a little more.

Hang your strands how you like them, and for your last step, you can glue a last ring to the top of the sun catcher facing the ceiling (with a string hanging from the holes) so you can hang it. And voila, you have a cheerful, beautiful sun catcher.

Hope you guys enjoyed and as always…

Happy crafting!

~Megan

 

 

 

 


DIY Spindle Windchimes

Posted on

Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

Last week I posted on a DIY for sun catcher wind chimes. This week, I have a tutorial for you from Confessions of a Serial DIYer on making some wooden wind chimes, and the full tutorial can be visited here.

I love wooden wind chimes for a number of reasons, but the biggest is probably the sound. Its pretty unique and you can use different wood types and lengths to make different sounds. The other part of this tutorial that I love is that the tools and materials are very simple.

For this project you’ll need spray paint in the colours of your choice, spindles from old chairs (for a good size). You can also use wooden dowels in various lengths for different sounds, or cut these ones to varying lengths. You’ll need fishing line, scissors, a drill and a very small drill bit (the size just needs to be big enough to drill holes through the wood for the fishing line) and super glue. For the hanging base, you will need a round piece of wood like the one pictured, but you can find bases like this attached to lamps or candle holders at thrift stores, or you can just buy a round disk of wood to use to the same end. You’ll also need a metal ring, the size is up to you, but you will just need something to tie your fishing line to so that you can hang your chimes.  Your last thing is a topper. it isn’t necessary, but it can be something you find in a thrift store, or something at home you’d like to repurpose.

Your first step is to spray paint your wooden parts. Please do this in a well ventilated area outside, and give them some time to dry.

When they’re dry, your next step is to drill tiny holes horizontally at the top of each spindle. For safety, wear safety glasses and have a spare piece of wood underneath where you’re drilling to catch the drill bit. This should keep you and your furniture safe.

Next, mark and measure where the spindles will hang on your base.  They should be hanging around the base in a circle, and be more or less equidistant from each other along the outer rim. The tutorial writer sanded everything to antique it a little, but this is a step that you can skip if it isn’t your preference.

Next, you can thread your spindles. Cut enough fishing line for each of your spindles. Cut half of the lengths at 12 inches, and half at 24 (so if you have 8 spindles, you’ll be cutting 4 and 4).

Thread the sorter string through the hole in the spindle, and then thread both ends through the top of the disk. Tie the string so that there’s a knot big enough not to fall through. If your holes are a little too big, you can thread a button onto the end and tie the thread around the button so that you basically have an easy peasy stopper.

With your 24 inch thread, thread it through the spindle and tie a couple knots a few inches up from the spindle before pulling it through the holes in the top piece – this will keep them from pulling through the top  and you can use the same trick with the button if your holes are too big.. Try to keep them hanging at about the same length as the 12 inch pieces, and then tie them to the ring when they’ve been threaded through.

Next, use superglue to affix your topper, whatever you’ve chosen it to be. Hang in your garden and enjoy!

Happy Crafting,

~Megan

 


DIY: Suncatcher Wind Chimes

Posted on

Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

I have a really neat DIY project for you. I was looking around at DIY wind chimes, as I absolutely love them. I grew up with someone in my family who always had them, and though I can’t remember who it was, I am always transported back to that time. There’s quite a few different tutorials online for making your own wind chimes, and I might post another one next week. But I came across this:

… and I just fell in love with the idea of suncatcher wind chimes, and thanks to this tutorial from Hands On as We Grow, there’s an easy way to make them, and not just that, but to have it be a project that you can do with your kids. You will need some supplies to do this though: Contact paper (you will want transparent rather than a patterned one) that can be found at any craft store, and maybe even some kitchen stores, scissors, a marker or pen, rings (your choice of size) from mason jar lids, string or cord, and a sturdy stick. Outside of these materials, you will need to go in search of foliage to actually keep inside the suncatcher portion of these chimes.

Your first step (other than collecting flowers) is to cut a piece of contact paper and trace mason jar rings onto the paper side of the stuff. Do as many as you have the rings for. Then you’ll want to peel the adhesive off and – very carefully – lay it on the table with the sticky side up.

When you have your foliage where you would like it, peel the other contact paper, and try to stick it as smoothly as you can over your creation. Cut out the circles.

Tie a knot around the rings using the string, and then simply push the suncatcher circles into the ring. They might be the right size enough to fit, or you might have to tape them in place. Then just attach them to a stick to turn them into some beautiful windchimes to hang near your window.

Hope you enjoyed this easy and beautiful tutorial.

Happy Crafting,

~Megan

 


DIY : Upcycled Concrete Vases

Posted on

Good morning, Thursday readers!

I have a special love in my heart for upcycling projects. I love the ability to make something old new again, even if it’s a completely different purpose you never would have thought of.  This project is probably not one I would do myself, given my lack of working space, but I think it’s super cool. These vases can be made from old bottles – glass or plastic, and boy do they look awesome. The original article can be found here posted by Brit.Co, who always has some great and unique diy projects.

You will need some tools and supplies: Commercial grade countertop mix in grey and white (you can ask at your local hardware store), plastic or glass bottles with caps, and some pens, candles or test tubes. As for tools, you’ll need a cordless drill, a box cutter and 7 inch diagonal pliers.

If you’re using plastic, you can cut the bottom off to create a large hole to work with, but with glass ones, only use bottles with a wide mouth. Start by drilling a hole in the caps of bottles large enough to hold your hole making device (the pen, test tube or candle) as this will leave a space in the inner chamber for these to be useful vases. Screw the caps back on with the piece inside.

Mix the concrete according to the manufacturers directions. You can use a mixture of different colours if you like as this tutorial used white and grey. For glass bottles, you want it to be a little runnier since the mouths are small and concrete is hard to pour. You next want to fill the bottles, and remember, you will be pouring overtop of your internal space maker. It will be messy. Prepare accordingly with drop sheets and outside spaces.  Tap and shake the bottles to remove air bubbles. If they have caps, screw them back on and let them sit for at least 24 hours, up to 4 or 5 days if you used a glass bottle.

When the concrete is dry and set and you’ve left none of that part to chance, if your bottle is plastic, you can cut away the plastic carefully with your box cutter and pliers. Though it’s concrete, it’s still fragile right now so you’ll have to be careful. If you used a glass bottle, break the glass with a hammer very carefully, and by tapping lightly. If you’re using glass, again, safety first so goggles, drop sheets, outdoor areas, etc.

Remove the caps. If you used a plastic pen or candle to create the inner chamber,  apply heat before removing. If you used a test tube, you can crush it with your pliers and pour out the fragments – by the way. I’ve seen test tubes at craft and dollar stores, so this might be a little easier. Level the bottoms with the knife if you need to, and then you might want to let them sit another day or two if you’re planning anything else with them.

You can add them to your home decor as is, or you can decorate them by painting them partially, or maybe sculpting into the concrete. Dealer’s choice, of course. Be creative!

Hope you enjoyed this tutorial, and happy crafting!

~ Megan


DIY Dinosaur Serving Dish

Posted on

Good morning, Thursday folks!

I’ve got a cute little DIY for you. I saw this as I was browsing earlier this week and said to myself, “Self, we would use one of those, wouldn’t we?” Well. Who doesn’t need a dinosaur serving plate?

The materials are simple, and can be found at second hand and craft stores. You’ll need a hard plastic dinosaur toy (it has to be sturdy and balanced so that it can be useful), a small melamine plate, sandpaper, strong adhesive, spray paint of your choice, a hand held saw and parchment paper for lining the plate (for food safety reasons). You can find the original tutorial here at Three Little Monkeys Studio.

First, use the saw to cut off the dino’s head just above the shoulders. Try to keep your cut level and use the sandpaper to smooth the cut edges. Also use the sandpaper to score the surface on the top and bottom of your plate so that your adhesive will hold better and have something to grip to.

Apply your adhesive to the body and plate (use the manufacturers directions on your adhesive, as some may want you to let it set before adhering). When you’re ready, attach the plate to the body and allow to cure for 24 hours. When everything has dried and cured, do the same for the dino’s head.

When you’re dry, you can start painting. If you’re feeling super creative, you can do multiple colours, designs of your own, or you can use your favorite spray paint in your favourite colour. A white dino plate is chic. A silver dino plate might be out of this world!

Happy crafting!

Megan

 

 


DIY: Paint Chip Calendar

Posted on

Good morning Thursday Crafthackers,

I saw this and though tit was pretty awesome, so I thought I’d share it with you. It’s a customizable calendar made out of paint chips. Which does mean that you can do whatever colour scheme you’d like and you can absolutely customize the sizing outside of what we’re showing you here. You can find the original tutorial here at DIY Projects.

For this project you will need a few things: A 12″ by 16″ picture frame (check your craft stores – they often have interesting and larger sizes), 35 paint chips in your choice of colours, scotch tape, scissors, a ruler and a dry erase marker. Your first step is to open the frame and take out the stock photo they have there. If you want a white background, just flip this over and use it as your background. If you’d like something a little more festive, you can use a piece of wrapping paper, wall paper, or you can wrap the back cardboard piece in fabric (though you may want to use a glue gun in that case rather than tape).  Next, measure a paint chip and cut it into a 3 and a quarter inches square – do this for all of them.

Lay out and affix the paint swatches to your board, and put 5 chips for each day. You can use a piece of some of the chips as a header for the day of the week if you like. Affix these by using tape – don’t worry, the picture frame will hold everything securely in place.

Your last step is to use your marker to label the calendar – the glass will work with the dry erase so you can customize it every month and add whatever you have going on through the month.

Happy crafting!

~Megan


DIY Scented Firestarters

Posted on

Good morning, Crafthackers!

It’s Friday morning, and here in Hamilton where I live, it’s snowy and cold. And when I say cold, I mean cold. With the windchill it’s -30 degrees Celsius today, so as you can guess, my day will consist of tea, sewing and embroidery! I was wandering around the internet though, and thought what a nice gift this would make for anyone who has a working fireplace. This tutorial is from Design Sponge, and it is relatively simple but super impressive! They’re pine cone fire starters.

Now I know what you’re thinking. That pine cones are natural fire starters… and they are, but for an indoor fireplace, you sometimes need a little extra burn time, and the scents that you can add to this project make it just that much better. You will need some stuff: You’ll need pine cones – which you can find yourself or you can often buy them at craft/hobby stores, twine (or candle wick), a double boiler (or a saucepan and large glass measuring cup), candle wax (about 3/4 cup per pinecone) – you can use beeswax or paraffin wax, it’s dealer’s choice. You will also need some bowls for setting the wax as well as any essential oils you’d like to use to scent the wax.

So, first get your double boiler boiling, and pour the wax beads/pieces into the top portion of the boiler, and add a few drops of the essential oil of your choice. Cinnamon or vanilla are great warming smells for the time of year that requires a fire.

Wrap your twine around the base of the pine cone, and feel free to be generous with your wrapping, but do keep it closer to the bottom of the pine cone – we’d like it to stay covered in wax – with the exception of a tail to hang outside of the wax (I’d leave a few inches)

Find a bowl (or other container) that the pine cone fits into nice and snug so there’s room for the wax but so that the edges of the pine cone are close to the edges of the dish. You’ll need to rub some oil all around the inside of the bowl to make it easier to get the wax out. Place the pine cone into the bowl with the wick tail sitting outside the bowl.

When the scented wax is fully melted, slowly pour it into the bowl. If the bowl is clear it will be hard to tell how full it is, but do what you can as you can always add more wax once it’s dry. 3/4 of an inch of wax is a good place to aim for.

When they are cooled, twist and pull your fire starters out of the bowl, and trim the wick down to about 3/4 of an inch , and you’re done. They’re ready to be used or gifted!

Happy crafting and stay warm out there!

~ Megan


DIY: Rag Rug

Posted on

Good morning Crafthackers!

I have for you today a tale as old as time… well. Maybe not quite that old, but it is something that’s been around for quite some time and I have to say, it makes me feel great that these things are still being made. Rag rugs. That’s right. I know people who had them, I used to make yarn rugs, and the process is similar. They’re easy to do, and the best part is you can use your fabric scraps and you can also customize the colours you want for whatever room they will be staying in.

As with many older crafts, there’s many places to find tutorials, and many different ways to do it. This one  has a few extra photos on the site and is from Craftaholics Anonymous.

This rug is super simple to make. You will need strips of your choice of fabric about 1 inch wide by 5 inches long, and you will need thousands. Lots and lots in the colours of your choice. I would personally recommend cotton (quilting or otherwise) as anything else would probably fray too much. The bottom of the rug is a non skid rug mat, which you might need to order, but also may find in home stores and possibly craft stores.

Basically, this tutorial doesn’t even tie the stips. They are just looped through the mat so that the centre of the strip hugs the rug mat. The rubber of the mat should hold it in place, but keep in mind, if you are going to be washing this mat, you will want to tie a knot or slipknot them like rug hooking. The tutorial also recommends that you skip some of the holes as the pieces are fluffy and big and having a piece of fabric on every part will make it overly fluffy. You can also use a latch hook like for rug hooking, if you would like. It’s simple, but it’s a great way to use your scraps and to make something that colour coordinates so easily with whatever your rooms are like.

 

Enjoy, and happy crafting!

~Megan


DIY: Light Up Halloween Tree

Posted on

Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

I came across this lovely DIY that is amazingly versatile since you can apply the same techniques to different holidays. All you need to do is use different colours and accents. Since Halloween is coming up soon though, it’s going to be a Halloween one, because it’s a holiday I love. I didn’t make this up myself, so you can find the full and original tutorial here.

You’ll need some materials, but they can be found at craft stores or hardware stores. If you make these a little closer to the holiday, you can often find the seasonal stuff on sale. You will need a 54″ tomato cage (lots of hardware stores sell them year round, but if not in your area, you could always order one) and you could do it any size for your space with a tutorial for making one from a larger cage here, but we will do this larger size for outdoor. You will also need 10-15 zip ties, 2 sets of 100 christmas lights (white works well with any colour ribbon, but keep in mind, if you can find other colours, purple or green would look just amazing), 5 rolls of mesh ribbon, 100 black pipe cleaners and extra seasonal decorations of your choice (like spiders, witches hats, sparkly pumpkins…)

If you’re going to be putting your tree into some soil, in a pot or on the ground, you can cut the widest ring off the cage so you can create stakes to hold them in place.You could also skip this step and have it sit on a flat surface, though you might need some extra ribbon.

Use a zip tie to attach together the top of the tree (the bottom of the cage) to create a tip that comes together.

 

Start adding lights and loop them around and around, using the zip ties to secure them every so often when they get droopy. You’re now ready to cut your ribbon.

 

You can use scissors. But if you have a rotary cutter, you can go for that too. Cut them at 10″ each so if you have 10″ wide ribbon, you’ll end up with 10″ squares.

Attach one pipe cleaner to the cage.

 

Accordion fold two pieces of mesh and hold them side by side.

This photos is with the two sets of two (so there’s 4 accordion folded pieces of mesh)

Twist them in the pipe cleaner. Repeat this at least twice per pipe cleaner, and keep adding the mesh until the tree is covered. You can clip any ends of pipe cleaners if they are a little long, but save them so you can use them to attach the decor.

Attach your little seasonal decorations to the pipe cleaners (or add in any extras you might want to). This tutorial writer even added witches legs, that would be super easy to do and super cute coming out of the bottom of a planter pot.

It just looks so good with the lights, it’s unbelievable!

 

And you’re done. And  you’re fabulous. And the best part is that after this tutorial you have a beautiful Halloween tree that’s covered in sparkly decorations and lights up when you plug it in.

Happy crafting!

~ Megan

 


Hand Felted Stone Rugs

Posted on

We’re bringing the outdoors indoors today with some really awesome looking handmade rugs. 😀

Crafted and sold by Etsy shop flussdesign, these rock rugs start at around $160, but the one pictured above costs $940. They come in all sorts of colors options too. So, yeah, if you’re low on cash now might be a good time to learn how to make felt stones, lol. I’ve never hand felted before, but I do know it’s very time consuming work so you’d better be prepared for that.

Maria Schuhman is the artisan behind these beauties and she also makes matching pillows, baskets, and loose decoration rocks! Her work is really well done, and i could see this rug working well with a crochet grass style rug to really bring your outdoor love into the clean dirt free space of your home. All of her felt stones are super soft and made from 100% wool so do be aware of any allergies you may have before falling in love. 😉