Spring Quilt Market

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Today is the start of Spring Quilt Market!  What is Quilt Market?

It is a credentialed quilt trade show.  This means you need to be a quilt shop owner or industry professional (professional quilter, teacher, designer, or publisher).  The fabric manufacturers, wholesalers, and companies that we want to see will all be there.  This is the show where we get to see everything new coming out!  I have seen a few previews and am SUPER excited about the new fabrics I will be able to get.

I am also super excited to see new products from some of my favorite Companies, Arrow and Sew Steady.  They have both agreed to give away products!

I will be giving another chair away from Arrow!

If you watch my Twitch live stream, you know how much I LOVE my Arrow sewing chair.  It is comfortable the wheels are amazing.  you really want one of these for yourself.

Another super special giveaway will be from Sew Steady.  We will be giving away their Ruler Work Kit.

I will be holding the giveaways today and tomorrow as well as live streaming, sharing photos, and maybe an interview or two!  Make sure you follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to see all of the goodies.  I won’t be picking winners until Monday so make sure you find the giveaway videos on my Facebook page, watch the video, and comment to win!

-Toni


DIY: Wine Bottle Chandelier

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Hi there Thursday Crafthackers!
I have for you a super cool tutorial that is relatively easy but still will take some time and some tools. The end result is super cool, and there are a number of different ways that you can do something like this.

There’s a number of different styles, and a number of different complexities in doing the electrical wiring for this. I thought this one was super cool. To do this you will need wine bottles – these ones were clear and then painted for colour, but you can absolutely do regular wine bottles if you like the green/brown hues.  If you’re liking the look of this (the original can be found here at Mod Podge Rocks Blog), and others like this tutorial, you might need this previous post on how to cut bottles safely. Make sure you follow the steps to sand down the edges, and if you would like to take any labels off, now would be the time.

This tutorial uses Mod Podge sheer colours, but there are methods to make the colours yourself with just one jar of Mod Podge (see if you can find a sheer one) and food colouring. You can find my tutorial for the ratios and the how to on the colour here (including how to set it). Use whichever you have the time and comfort level for. You’ll need the basics of the world of crafting, so craft paper/wax paper or a non stick craft mat, a craft knife, and you will also need the pendant light hardware kits which you should be able to find easily at any hardware store, or at an online retailer like Amazon.

Whether  you make your own colours or buy pre tinted Mod Podge, your first step is to get the inside of your bottles covered. You can do this by adding a generous amount of glue/colour to the inside of the bottle and swirling it around inside until it is covered. Try to get as far up the neck as possible so you get consistent colour all the way up. Do this to each bottle. Whether you use the same, themed or different colours is up to you. If you’re making your own colours, remember that you can change your one batch of colour just by adding other colours of food colouring to change the tints. You’ll either need to follow the directions in the previously mentioned tutorial for baking the wine bottles, or you will need to let them dry overnight (sitting on the mouth of the bottle to get maxiumum air flow) After they’re dry, if you want to add any stencils or glitter, now is the time.

The original poster used a light fixture like this. They didn’t use the switch on the cord, and cut the cord before that point since they manually are wiring everything together.

The wiring was cut about 2 feet from the bulb socket base, but you can do them longer or shorter based on the needs of your space. If there is a switch on your fixture, you can cut below it if you aren’t using it. Above if you would like to keep it.

Run the cut end of the cord up through the neck of the bottle so that the bulb socket fits nicely in the taper.

Expose the ends of each of the wires using your wire cutters to peel away the plastic coating (there will be 12 wires, hot and a neutral for each lamp or 18 if the kit is wired for a ground). This tutorial used a room that already had a simple ceiling fixture on a wall switch. This made it easy to take down and I just used the existing junction box and cover plate from the old light to mount my wine bottle chandelier. With the wall switch OFF (throw the service breaker for extra safety) take down the old ceiling light and find the white (neutral), black (hot), and green (ground) wires. Pull them down out of the box and make sure you have enough room to go back with the new wire bundle you’re going to create.

Next, combine all the neutral wires from the lamp kits together into one pigtail. Do the same for the hot and the ground if present. Use some electrical tape to help hold them all together while you get ready to connect them to the junction box. Using an appropriately sized wire nut, connect the white pigtail of the lamp kit to the white (neutral) wire from the ceiling. DO the same with the Black (hot) and ground (green, if present). Carefully push the wires up into the junction box and allow the weight of the lamps to be carried by the bundled lamp cords over the junction box support bar.

Slide the fixture cover you used from the old light up into place to cover everything.

You should be able to flip your switches and bring light! Hope you enjoyed this tutorial and remember to work safely with any electricity!

Happy crafting.

~Megan


DIY: Rustic Magnetic Knife Rack

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Hello Thursday Readers,

Here’s a nifty little tutorial I found for something I’ve always had a soft spot for: a magnetic knife rack. Now of course, if you’re going to do this tutorial, you’ll need to ensure safety first, so when choosing a place to mount this beauty, you will need to make sure that it is out of the reach of any little hands, and not in any danger of being knocked off accidentally. The original tutorial for this was posted here, if you’d like to visit the source.

You will, of course, need some tools and materials. You’ll need a wood board 15 inches by 3.5 inches. You can reclaim wood, or even use driftwood. You can pick it up at the hardware store, sand and stain it yourself. It all depends on how you want it to look. You’ll also need some sandpaper, a tape measure, trigger clamps (these are optional) a power drill with a 1 inch round Forstner bit, 1 inch round ceramic magnets (54 of them), some gel adhesive, a 5/32 drill bit, and 2.5 inch wall mounting screws (two of them).

Your fist step is to measure and cut the board to your desired size. For this particular tutorial though, it was made to be 15 inches long. If you’re buying wood at a hardware store, they will generally cut wood to your preferred size for no extra cost. You will need to clean and sand the board to your desired finished. As I said, if you want to apply stain and sealer, now is the time. Decide which side of the board you’d like to display and then turn it over to measure the back where you will be inlaying the magnets.

Allow one inch on each end of the board for drilling the wall screws into and then mark two straight lines 2.5 inches apart. This will help you line up your two rows of magnets. On each of the lines, mark nine points that are 1.5 inches apart, and you’re ready to drill. Your goal is to have two central rows of nine holes that measure half an inch apart.

It is now time to make the holes so you can inlay your magnets. Use your Forstner drill bit, which will drill a solid round well into the wood. The key to having a good, strong magnetic hold is to get the magnet as close to the front of the wood as possible, so you want to drill as far as you can without drilling through the surface. You might want to practice this a couple times before you begin for realsies, and when you find the right depth for the drill, you can put a piece of painter’s tape on your drill to mark where you should stop. This will take the guesswork out of your drilling.

You can use trigger clamps to hold the wood in place to allow for more overall control during this step. Then you can drill your 18 holes (two rows of nine) as close to the surface as possible, leaving about 1/8 inch of wood where the magnets will sit.

Now is the time if you’d like to have starter holes for your screws in the sides. Measure and drill a starter so you don’t have to guess where the screw will be going.  So for the strongest hold, stack three 1 inch round ceramic magnets together. Use your adhesive to glue your magnets to the back of the board. It isn’t necessary to glue the magnets to each other… they’ll stick to themselves.

Use your wall mounting screws to mount the rack in place on your wall, and then you’re ready to display all your wonderful knives!

 

I hope that you enjoyed this tutorial. I thought it was really neat, and such a cool way to display some pretty amazing sliceware.

Happy Crafting!

~ Megan


DIY Pom Pom Rug

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Got a nice simple project today with spring break coming up for many. It’s a super cute and easy DIY rug that would work great in the kitchen, kid’s room, or heck even a dorm room.

Here’s your materials list:

  • 4-6 yarn balls (thick or ultra thick)
  • Large container lid, chair back or other household item to wrap yarn around
  • Scissors
  • Rug base canvas

And if you don’t like videos, you can find the full written out steps here on Hello Giggles. 😀


DIY: Stenciled Glass Tabletop

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Good morning Thursday readers!

I found something that’s super cool that I thought I should share with you, for anyone who has a table with a glass top inset who wants to spruce it up.  I am using this tutorial from Nomadic Decorator as a how to, and you can go to her website to check out the full tutorial for this and other really neat ideas.

Now that you’ve seen it, don’t you want to make it? You will need some tools and supplies for this project. Obviously, your clear glass surface (that has been cleaned with glass cleaner), a ruler, a stencil of your choice, stencil brushes and stencil cream paint. You can see the specifics of brand and paint colours in the original tutorial. There are paints that are designed for glass, though you can be a little less concerned about that if you are painting the underside of a table that won’t get bumped, scratched or cleaned. Which you use is up to you though.

With stenciling on glass, you need to paint your colours in reverse – so your background should be the last thing you paint. You will also want to make sure that your glass is clean so that dust, fingerprints or anything else won’t be forever painted onto the glass. So the first step is to do any foreground detail you would like first, and this blogger did copper specks all over, so she did that first by flicking a brush with paint on it to get a very fine spray.

The next step is to use the ruler to find the centre of the table, and put the centre of your stencil there. After your stencil is where it should be you can use one paint colour or a combination of hues to paint your design. Just remember to use your stencil brush properly, so rather than brushing in strokes, you will be tapping the brush up and down onto the stencil, so that the paint doesn’t run, or move the stencil or have a harsh blending of colours. This will almost be like painting with a sponge. Remember that you can have the paint be as thick or thin as you choose, and this technique will allow for a smooth transition between multiple colours. This tutorial mixes 3 different metallic shades, but use whichever colours speak to your soul. Just make sure your design paint is thick enough that you won’t see your background colour through it. You might need a couple of layers for this.

Your last step is to remove the stencil and use your background colour to paint over the entire stencil, making sure to get to all the edges. Again, you might want to do this in a couple coats to make sure that you get good coverage. You can also use a bigger stencil brush to speed the process along.

Though I can’t take credit for it, I thought that this was just a beautiful way to give new life to old pieces of furniture, and gives an option to those who are shopping through second hand and vintage stores a new idea for how to turn a regular coffee table (or something larger…) into something with a definite wow factor.

Happy crafting!

~Megan

 


Retro Video Game Shadow Boxes

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My husband and I have started a collection of the games we grew up on (NES and SNES mostly), but this person blows our simple little plastic cases out of the water.

Designed and made by Glitch Artwork, these shadow boxes give a bit of art and style to your gaming collection. They layouts are well thought out and visually appealing; so much so that the gaming cart isn’t the first thing to grab you. Quite a feat when it takes up about 1/4 of the space.

If you’ve got your own collection, or maybe a few favorite games you’d like to keep, I’d recommend giving their shop a look. The frames range from $35-75 and are definitely a way to class up your home, while still showing your gaming love. 🙂


New Studio!

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My studio is finally finished!

It took a lot of hard work, but I am ready to start live streaming and record tutorials!  Here are some of the pictures of the studio in progress.

I was super excited to unbox my new Olivia Sewing Cabinet by Arrow.

The sewing area is a lot wider than the Ikea table I used before allowing me to work on larger quilts.  The extension table on the back prevents quilts from hanging off and adding weight and pressure to the machine/  The new chair is very comfortable and give me a perfect height to use my machine.

The other new additions are my two Mod Thread Cabinets.

They hold all of my thread and I still have room for more!  They are super easy to use and all I need to do is spin around, pull out the right rack, and choose a color.

The last addition is the lighting set up and cameras to record.

This will allow you to see what I am doing without any shadows.  So where will I be streaming?  On Twitch!  Twitch is the world’s leading social video platform and community for gamers, video game culture, and the creative arts.  As a video game and comic book quilter, I think it is a perfect fit.

Follow my Twitch channel and then watch when I sew!  My streaming schedule can be found here.   My backers on my Patreon page will have input on when they would like to see me and what they would like to see.  Streaming starts next week!

Now to get sewing.


D.I.Y Fabric Chandelier.

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Hello Thursday Crafthackers.

You know, when I first looked at this DIY, I wasn’t sure how I felt about it. The more I looked at it though, the more I started to like it and started to brainstorm how I might do it a little differently. This tutorial is from A Beautiful Mess and you can find the full tutorial here. Probably my favourite thing about this DIY is that it is apartment friendly! To those of you who don’t have the space to do anything big, the permission to tear down walls or make too many holes in them, or who just plain want to have some nice looking things without the time/space/money investment of buying and installing a super statement piece, this may be for you! I just love how simple the supplies are:

The cooling rack you might be able to find at a garage sale, but you can find them at any kitchen store. Your fabric, any fabric store, but rather than browsing the shelves, I would recommend searching through their bargain bins, and if you’re lucky enough to live near an “end of roll” fabric store or one that has this type of section, then you can get a lot of fabric for super cheap. Your twinkle lights you can find at any hardware store (and if you go after Christmas you might be able to find them on sale). Your lace, you should also check for in bargain bins, or even see if a relative has any lace curtains that they’re getting rid of. You’ll also need 2 hooks that can screw into a wall and a drill.

Your first step of work is to cut your strips of fabric in varying widths, ranging from half an inch to two inches. This will help give depth and make your chandelier more interesting. Next, you can create texture by loosely stitching through them with the embroidery thread and bunching them before tying a knot in the thread. Here’s a video to show you how ruching works with fabric so you can get an idea of how easy this actually is. It can be done by hand for loose gathers or machine for tight. For your ruched strands, spread them out evenly and make sure to leave enough thread so you can tie them to the rack.

Starting about 5 rows from the outer edge, fold the ends of each strip of fabric over the rod, and hand stitch each foldd flap to the strip (see the photo above to see what words have trouble saying). You should vary shades, textures and thicknesses, but on the inside rows you should use more thicker ones. They will need to cover your lights and add density to your chandelier. Tie a knot at the end of the row (you can just sew continually without having to tie off on every strip) and trim  your thread. Repeat this until the outer 5 rows on each side have been covered. You will want to use thinner strips and lacy fabrics on the outer row.  Add 3 or 4 strips of fabric along the middle rows, just at each end (again, please check out the photo. You will be making a box of fabric). You will end up with a big hole in the middle for the lights to hang and for some thin strips to be added.

. Use a thin strip and wrap it around the edge of your sheet to cover the exposed metal. Stitch together at each end to secure, and do the same on the other side. It’s just like wrapping coat hangers to give them a little more pop.

Carefully attach your twinkle lights. Start with the plug near the back left (or right) corner and tie it near the top with a thin strand of fabric or with white twist ties. Continue to tie up your lights in three or four places, but be sure to let them hang down so that you will get light through the whole chandelier. Just don’t let them hang down below the fabric.. Cut 3 strips of fabric measuring about 2.5″ in width and stitch them together at the end, and do this 3 more tiems. You will need 4 sets of 3 pieces stitched together. I would start by making them double the length that you will need for hanging, as you will be braiding them and it is easier to trim fabric than it is to add. If you want to skip these steps entirely, you can just use sections of chain that you can buy at any hardware and even fabric store.

Pull one strand through the corner, and then braid the three strands together. This will support one corner. You’ll need to repeat this step for all 4 corners. If you have the patience to do the fabric  braiding, it will help hide the cords for the lights. You can attach your extension cord to the plug on the lights (which should be attached at one corner already), and braid it with the strand on that corner. Draw all 4 strands up so that they are equal in length and then tie them in a large knot.

Drill a pilot hole in your ceiling and hang a strong hook where you’d like to hang your chandelier – or you can use a hook you might already have. You may want to drill a second hook to hold your extension cord away from the light, and then you are ready to plug and have a statement chandelier! You can trim your fabric to be any height you like and you can do varying lengths if you prefer.

It looks pretty neat photographed in the daylight, but I think it would look so amazing at night. So to keep in mind, you don’t need to use cream fabric, if cream isn’t your thing.  You can always mix and match different colours, just be aware of how thick or transparent the fabric is. Black and red would look amazing, but you would need to make sure that your blacks are a little more transparent so that it doesn’t just block out all the light.  If you don’t mind seeing the twinkle lights, you could use lace, chiffon and other semi-transparent fabrics. If you’re feeling super arts and crafty, you can add rhinestones, or crystals, and if you’re a fan of things being rainbow, consider using multicoloured lights with cream. I hope that you enjoyed this simple and yet impressive tutorial.

Happy crafting!

~Megan

 


DIY Doorknobs.

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Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!
I found something that’s a super cool, super cheap way to do an update to your kitchen cabinets, closets and wherever else might use a knob. I bring you, from The Painted Hive, a fabulously easy and cheap doorknob tutorial (you can find the full one here, with a plethora of photos) that can look super cool when it’s done.

These are super easy and you don’t need many tools or supplies. You will need some plain timber knobs that you can find at any hardware store (in whatever size would work for you), spray/craft paint, clear matte spray sealer, scissors, a paint brush, an adhesive (mod podge a similar craft glue will work just fine), and images, paper (as well as a printer and a connection to the internet will make this much easier), and paint to match the images you’ve chosen.

Notice how the colours of the knobs match the background colours of the images – this will help keep the illusion of seamlessness.

 

Your first step is to use your computer to create or find an image that you’d like to see on your knob and scale down to fit on the size that you’ve chosen. Print your images out onto regular copy paper, and colour match the background of your image with the paint you are using for your knob. Then, you can go ahead and paint the knob your colour, and be sure to let it dry.

Lightly spray your images with a clear matte sealer. This will give your images a protective coating and stiffen them slightly to keep the ink from running and the paper from bubbling and buckling when you’re gluing them.

 

Once they’re dry, cut the images out, cutting as closely as you can to the symbol using very sharp scissors or a craft knife.
Using your paint brush, apply a thin coat of adhesive to your knob, and while the glue is still wet, position your image in place. Press down firmly and smooth out any air bubbles, making sure that you keep your eye on the edges and that they are all nicely attached.

When you’re done, give your knobs a few sprays of the matte spray sealer. For extra protection finish off your project with a few coats of brushed-on clear acrylic poly too.  And you’re done!

You can do this with almost any image you can find, so be creative and find ones that speak to you.

Hope you guys enjoyed this, have fun, and as always…

Happy Crafting!

 

~Megan


DIY – Exploding Death Star Lamp

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So I found this awesome little Gem over the weekend that I just knew I had to share with my fellow geeky crafters. 😀 It’s a fairly low cost project, but it will take you some time, and lots of painting.

Here’s your materials list:

  • IKEA PS 2014 Lamp
  • Light Grey Spray Paint
  • Masking Tape
  • X-acto Knife
  • Dark Grey Paint (either acrylic or spray depending on color options in your area)
  • Sealant Spray Paint

You’ll find the full step by step instructions over here. The quick and short of it though, is you’ll be spray painting the whole lamp shell with the light grey spray paint first, and marking and using masking tape to block certain areas off once it’s dried. After that you paint the whole thing again; with the darker spray paint if your lucky, of by hand if you’re not. Do one more round of spraying (2 if you’re paranoid) with a sealant spray and you’re done! It’s a pretty simple project that could easily be done in the afternoon if you have all the materials. 🙂 Then you too will be able to explode the Death Star whenever you like!