DIY: Rag Rug

Posted on

Good morning Crafthackers!

I have for you today a tale as old as time… well. Maybe not quite that old, but it is something that’s been around for quite some time and I have to say, it makes me feel great that these things are still being made. Rag rugs. That’s right. I know people who had them, I used to make yarn rugs, and the process is similar. They’re easy to do, and the best part is you can use your fabric scraps and you can also customize the colours you want for whatever room they will be staying in.

As with many older crafts, there’s many places to find tutorials, and many different ways to do it. This one¬† has a few extra photos on the site and is from Craftaholics Anonymous.

This rug is super simple to make. You will need strips of your choice of fabric about 1 inch wide by 5 inches long, and you will need thousands. Lots and lots in the colours of your choice. I would personally recommend cotton (quilting or otherwise) as anything else would probably fray too much. The bottom of the rug is a non skid rug mat, which you might need to order, but also may find in home stores and possibly craft stores.

Basically, this tutorial doesn’t even tie the stips. They are just looped through the mat so that the centre of the strip hugs the rug mat. The rubber of the mat should hold it in place, but keep in mind, if you are going to be washing this mat, you will want to tie a knot or slipknot them like rug hooking. The tutorial also recommends that you skip some of the holes as the pieces are fluffy and big and having a piece of fabric on every part will make it overly fluffy. You can also use a latch hook like for rug hooking, if you would like. It’s simple, but it’s a great way to use your scraps and to make something that colour coordinates so easily with whatever your rooms are like.

 

Enjoy, and happy crafting!

~Megan


Flower Crowns and Horns

Posted on

I know it’s become a big ~thing~ on the internet to give bad guys flower crowns but sometimes you just want your own real flower crown to feel pretty yourself. If that’s you then I’ve got a great shop to recommend.

Hand made in Europe by Katerina Metamorphose, these flower crowns are some of the best I’ve seen. Each flower is made by hand from varying textiles and can be custom tailored to fit your needs. Not into flower crowns and more of a laurels or leaf person, she’s got you covered! You can also find unique horn wreathes, antlers and Unicorn horns to accompany a wide variety of costume possibilities. Yes you’ll have some wait time if you live outside of the EU, but man is this quality worth it. I highly recommend giving her Etsy store a look thru if this at all strikes your fancy. ūüôā


It’s Getting Cold Outside

Posted on

Happy Sunday, all!

It’s finally feeling like fall here in the Midwest US, so that means it’s also colder and damper. It usually stays pretty warm in our snug little condo until about mid-December when we try to avoid turning on the heat for as long as possible. But it still gets me to thinking about and planning for those times when I need some extra warmth for my extremely cold feet. First plan of attack is usually to cover with an extra blanket, the easiest being one of those tied fleece type ones. To help with that, Kim from A Girl and a Glue Gun has some excellent instructions and ideas for different types of quick fleece blankets:

Second cold foot defense would be to find something that actually covers the feet themselves. I’ve seen plenty of DIY mermaid tails snuggle sack patterns¬†but I had yet to see a dino/dragon tail until now:

Thanks to Bernat and All Free Crochet, you too can have the long, luxurious spiky tail you’ve always wanted. Definitely a must to keep those feet toasty. Lastly, if you’ve got a little time on your hands and some extra fabric you could make these lovely pockets that are solely for warming your feet:

I’ve been wanting to make the foot warmer from Little Oak Creations ever since I posted about those rice/corn/flax hand warmers (A Hand Warming Experience). The top portion houses the recently heated packets and your poor cold feet go directly under them in the cushy bottom. Think warm thoughts and heat up some cocoa, everyone! Next week we’ll take a look at some cool DIY¬†host/hostess gifts for the inevitable holiday parties.

Stay crafty!

~Laura


How to Cut on the Bias

Posted on

If you pick up a piece of fabric, you can stretch it in three ways, vertically, horizontally, and diagonally.  This diagonal stretch is the stretchiest and is the bias of the quilt.  You may need a cut of bias for hems, bindings, or may have a pattern that calls for this special stretch.  But cutting the bias may be something new to you.

The Dutch Label Shop is where I get my special labels for the backs of my quilts.  I love the quality of the labels and the way they look on my quilts.  In addition to making a great product, they periodically blog about important things sewers should know.  One of the blogs they ran was how to cut on the bias.

Reposted from The Dutch Label Shop:

First, you have to understand two other fabric terms: selvage and grain.

WHAT IS SELVAGE

Selvage is the name given to the self-finished edges of a piece of fabric. It keeps the fabric from unravelling and fraying. Often it serves the further purpose of providing information about the producer and designer, information that is printed directly onto the unpatterned area.

When a fabric store associate pulls down a bolt, rolls it out on their cutting table, and cuts you a portion of it, they will always cut perpendicular to the selvage. Each piece of fabric will therefore have two self-finished edges, top and bottom.

WHAT IS GRAIN

Just like wood or meat, fabric has a grain. In reference to fabric, the term ‚Äúgrain‚ÄĚ indicates the way the fabric is knit or woven together. Take a close look at any piece of fabric. You will notice threads running parallel and perpendicular to the selvage. This is the grain of the fabric. Take your hands and place them on a perpendicular line and try pulling the fabric. There will be no give. Do the same on a parallel line. Again, the fabric will not stretch. Cutting along a parallel or perpendicular line is cutting ‚Äúwith the grain.‚ÄĚ

WHAT IS BIAS

Now, back to bias. Take your hands and place them on the opposite selvage, diagonally across from each other, and pull. The fabric stretches! This is because you are pulling along the bias, against the grain. When a pattern calls for a bias cut, it is to take advantage of this stretchy quality. Bias is the thread line which cuts the grain at a 45 degree angle.

 

BIAS SEWING BASICS: HOW TO CUT ON THE BIAS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOW TO CUT ON THE BIAS

To easily measure this 45 degree angle, take the top corner of your fabric and fold it down to the bottom edge of the fabric, creating a diagonal fold. Cut along the fold, and voila! You’ve cut on the bias.

If you would like to see more posts by Dutch Label shop or check out their cool labels, you can find them here.


Free Halloween Tutorials!

Posted on

One of my favorite holidays is fast approaching!

I saw a cool free Mommy and Me circle skirt tutorial on Fabric.com a few days ago and wanted to check out Sweet Red Poppy, the designer.  There are so many tutorials and free patterns on her site I just had to share the Halloween ones!

If you would like to add Sweet Red Poppy to your blog lineup, you can find the blog here.

-Toni


The Cheap Dye That is Surprisingly Decent

Posted on

Dying things can be a long and expensive process sometimes. Not to mention all the steps you have to go through to prepare it so that it’ll stay. Thankfully, the internet has come to our rescue once more! Today I’ll be sharing the secrets of using the cheap drink brand Kool-aid as your all purpose dye.

I first started looking into this when I can across a post were a leather user talked about how they decided to try this just for laughs while making a drink:

I was making a drink while cutting the snaps off some new straps for my pauldrons and I got curious, so I tried it, thinking, ‚Äúok even if this works, it will just wash out.‚ÄĚ

Nope.

It took the ‚Äúdye‚ÄĚ (undiluted) in about 3 seconds. After drying for about an hour and a half, it would not wash off in the hottest tap-water. It would not wash out after soaking for 30 minutes.

They then go on to talk about how it took boiling the dyed leather to even slightly remove the dye. O.O That’s some pretty powerful stuff there. So, what can we learn from this and apply for ourselves? Well, after some experimenting and reading on my part, I’ve found that Kool-aid as a dye works pretty well for a variety of natural fiber mediums such as leather, wool, cotton, hair, flax, jute, silk and so on. You’ll also need to make sure that you’re not just making Kool-aid proper and then adding your items to it. It needs to be the flavor only packet/liquid as the pre mixed once have sugar. The sugar will make your end product sticky and unusable down the line. That’s no good for anyone

Also, you’ll want to heat the dye water up, just like you would with commercial dyes. This helps stimulate the molecules and ‘activate’ the dye to help the color permeate. Once it’s set for 20-30mins, let it dry and then rise in cold water to remove the excess. ūüėÄ Several people have even made charts to help others achieve desired colors! A quick google search gave me this one, but there are loads more, including yarn results which very much so appeal to me, lol.

So there you have it. Never think that dying something it out of your budget as long as you have access to Kool-aid. ^_^



Star Wars the Last Jedi Fabric

Posted on

With the new Star Wars trailer released this week all I can think about is everything Star Wars!  Just in time Camelot has released a new line of fabric!  You may be able to find them in your local quilt store now!

Tomorrow I will share some amazing free patterns you can use this fabric to make!

-Toni


DIY: Mini Mummies

Posted on

Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

I found an amazingly cute and easy Halloween decor DIY that I couldn’t pass up sharing with you. They are as the title describes, and the original post I came across can be found here.

For this project you need a few supplies, but they’re pretty easy to find at any craft and fabric shop. You’ll need some styrofoam balls (whatever size you like, or varying sizes), muslin (at least 1/4 yard, but more if you’re going to be making many), eyelets or brads, tea bags, a spray bottle, 22 gague floral wire and glue.

Your first step? Make a cup of tea for you and a cup of tea for your mummies. That’s right… the tea for you is fuel for your day. The tea for your mummies is to give them a spray at the end for colour.

Next, select a styofoam ball and press two eyelets or brads between the middle and top of the ball as eyes (you can dab them in a little glue for better hold, if you like).  For legs, cut two pieces of the floral wire, and bend each into an oval. Stick them into the bottom of the ball. You can choose to make them whatever length you prefer, so if you want a mummy with super long legs and a wee little head, it can be done!

Cut 3/8 inch wide strips of muslin and begin wrapping the ball until it is covered, going around the eyes and legs. Use glue to adhere the ends of the strips on the ball.

Remove the tea bag from the mummy tea and put it into the spray bottle. Spray the mummy lightly and let it dry. When it’s dry, give it another spray and continue this process until you get the colouring you like, and just like that, you have a cute collection of the undead.

Happy Crafting!

~Megan

 


Batiks Go Retro Blog Hop

Posted on

The Batiks Go Retro Blog hop is under way!  I was stop #3 Wednesday on my Quiltoni Blog so I wanted to share it here as well.

You can find the other hoppers joining in at the bottom of this post, so make sure you read them all!

I was asked by Tamarinis to create something pixelated for her first line of fabrics with Island Batiks.  Why pixelated?  Because I am a pixel quilter!  Even though I specialize in geeky quilts, I like a challenge.  First I had to think of a design.  Here are some of the amazing fabrics that I got to choose from.

That starburst pattern is pretty cool and has a few color options.  I decided to use those fabrics and create a pixelated design based on the design in the fabric.

After figuring out the pattern I decided to put the pastels together and the bold colors together.  I wanted to show the same pattern with different colorways so decided on a double sided quilt. After sewing strips together I cut out all of the pieces and laid them out.

 

Then it was time to assemble the rows.

After assembling rows, I added a border of fussy cut background fabric around to show the design of the fabric off as well as pull the rows together to allow for easier quilting.

Once the quilt was finished I quilted it with just regular straight lines to give it a more modern feel.  The binding choice was to give it a color pop completely different than the fabrics I chose, but is part of the collection.  I really like the finished product and it was a lot of fun making it!

  

Next on the Blog hop is Purple Moose Designs. ¬†Make sure you visit them all! ¬†And don’t forget to enter the Rafflecopter giveaway at the bottom to¬†win great prizes, including a wonderful Tamarinis pattern pack, fabric, thread and more from several of the designers in the blog hop!

Sept 11th: Island Batik, Aurifil Thread