DIY with Scrapbook Paper

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Hello Thursday Readers,

One thing I never got into but always sort of wished had the time for was scrapbooking. I love all the pretty things that you can do with it and the papers, the lush papers are amazing and there are some pretty easy DIY projects that you can do for your home or for a gift that would look just amazing. This is a very quick one, and doesn’t require a lot of time or skill to do, just the materials. I am actually going to combine two DIY ideas from a lovely person I have featured here before called the Nomadic Decorator.

For this DIY you’ll just need an adhesive like Mod Podge (though she actually recommends Aleene’s Tacky Glue instead, because it is less wet and will help the paper stay flat. She also recommends trying a spray adhesive). You will need pieces of amazing 12×12 scrap paper – and the heavier weights and thicker papers are recommended.You will also need some 12×12 wooden panels, which you might find at your local craft stores. at a local hardware store, or  you can order them online at places like this. Though this DIY is very simple, your materials and technique are what will really make it pop on your wall.

All you need to do is paint the sides of your exposed wood, and then brush a layer of glue onto the panel. Place the scrapbook paper on the glue and then use a ruler, a credit card or really anything with a sharp, flat edge to start from the centre and work your way outwards to press out the bubbles that may have formed under your craft paper. You can seal it if you’d like, and you can seal it very well with an outdoor sealant if you’d like to decorate an outdoor (but not too exposed to the elements) place. And that’s it! You can make as many as you want to cover however big a space you’d like. I love that these are so easy and that you can do this to suit your style.

There’s an extra step that you can do if you’d like to dress it up and make these a little bit more lush.You can use this other tutorial to stencil your scrapbook hangings to bring a little metalic or whatever other color you’d like onto your scrapbook hangings. This new tutorial shows you how to make one bigger hanging but I love the idea of using a stencil on a couple of these smaller ones as part of a whole to give a little extra pop. I especially love the metallic.

You’ll need a few extra tools – a stencil brush and stencil, paint and a bowl (with a paper towel) for blotting so you don’t goop all over the stencil. If you need help with stenciling, there are plenty of ideas here. Basically, I would recommend applying some beautiful stencils (that you can order online or find at a craft store) after everything is dry, but before you seal your work. I would also recommend doing a couple pieces as an eyecatcher rather than doing each individual square, unless you’re planning on following the tutorial to create one big one.

I hope you enjoyed this simple but really lovely and lush marriage of these two tutorials. I love, love, love simple tutorials that look so much more involved than they are for a really impressive result.

Enjoy, and happy crafting!

~ Megan


Tinted Decorative Glass

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Hey there Thursday readers!

Well, where we’ve just had Pi day, and it is indeed March, it’s snowy here, where I live, and it doesn’t look like the snow is going to stop anytime soon. Does that mean we shouldn’t be looking at spring focused DIY? Not at all! What better way than to do a craft that can be used for flowers and decor or for lining window ledges to get a smattering of colour. I am bringing for you a super easy tutorial for making tinted glass. Now, usually you see this kind of thing done in the form of beach glass, where glass jars are done in an aqua colour. This one is a little different because the tints used are really nice and vintage – like antique medicine bottles. I have used the tutorial from Fancy that Design House, and of course there many tutorials floating around, but as I said, I loved the colours that were chosen for these jars, and I love how easy it is.

I love the look of these and they’re so easy and can be used as really beautiful accents to any rustic decor, or to sit on windowsills to tint the light coming in. I also love that you can just save your old pasta, jam, mason or any jars you fancy to use for this, so it can be done on the cheap.

You will need some supplies, but they are minimal and you might just have them laying around the house. If you don’t, Mod Podge (or a similar craft adhesive) can be bought at almost any  craft store, and then the others you can pick up at any grocery store. Just make sure that outside of the jars, mod podge and food colouring that you also supply yourself with mixing bowls, some newspaper to cover your work area and to line a baking sheet (rather than using rather expensive parchment paper), a baking sheet, paper towels, and a stir stick or spoon. You’ll also be heat blasting them in an oven, so, you’ll need access to one of those too.

 

Your first step is to mix Mod Podge, water and food colouring in a small mixing bowl. For just one jar, you’ll need about 1 tbsp of mod podge with about 1/2 tbsp of water, so depending on how many jars you will be doing, you’ll need to bulk up your recipe as necessary. In this bowl you’ll also want to mix your food colouring. Depending on the colours that you’re wanting to do, you can start with a more green colour, and add drops of food colouring as you go to give you variations in your colouring so that you don’t have to make separate batches of the goo to have different colours. Just add a drop of whichever colour moves you after each one. Though the goo might look gross, rest assured when it dries it will be a glorious antiqued browish colour.

You will also need to prep a baking sheet by lining it with newspaper. You’re now ready to pour the gross looking goo mixture into your jar and rotate it around so that the inside gets completely covered. Be ready with a paper towel when you get to the mouth of the jar, to catch any dribbles as you reach the edge, and make sure that all the glass is covered or you’ll have a bald spot.

Put your covered jar upside down on the covered baking sheet and repeat the steps above if you’re doing more jars. Remember to change up your colour mix a little! You want to let your jars sit upside down for about an hour so that any extra goo can run down the sides and exit. This will also help prevent streaks.

In the meantime, prepare another baking sheet by lining it with wax paper ( though I don’t see why you wouldn’t be able to use parchment if it’s on hand, or even foil). When your waiting period is up, turn your jars right side up and put them on the newly prepared sheet. You might have leftover goo puddles, but that’s okay, just bundle them up and throw away the newspaper. Put your tray with the jars right side up in a warm oven (225 degrees F) for about 45 minutes. If you check after 45 minutes and notice streaks, leave them in a little longer. When your time is up and you don’t have streaks, remove from the oven and give them plenty of time to cool.

There’s just a few things to remember. Some streaks will be inevitable, especially the darker you go. These jars aren’t great for water, as Mod Podge is water soluble. So if you insist on putting things in there that require water – you could try putting a coat of water resistant sealant, but there’s no guarantee. Rather than fresh flowers, try getting some silk foliage, or dried flowers in the fall. My mother uses delicate branches from bushes in her garden and they look fabulous.

Happy crafting!

~ Megan

 


‘Bad Weather’ Days

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Happy Wednesday! Across many parts of the United States, we are being hit by bad weather towards the end of our winter. Trees had begun blooming, grass growing, and in rolls the storm. Suddenly you are stuck at home, with or without power, wondering what to do with your day off…

As long as I am warm and there is power, I try not to worry too much. Relaxing on my favorite chair with a book or movie and drinking some coffee or cocoa is a great day for me. Some people like to keep busy, though. This may be the perfect time to bring out some crafts or games you’ve been waiting to try.

  • If you like to crochet, this fun PDF pattern of an Octopus Scarf looks great!
  • If you like knitting, maybe some fingerless gloves!
  • If it look like there might be power issues, a candlemaking project might be a good one. Check here for a recipe!
  • Some people love to cook, especially a one pot stew or recipe. I’ve found some great ones on Epicurious, or you might open up one of your cookbooks- I have several from family members.

Whether it’s a project or a lazy day, stay warm and safe this week!

 


DIY Vinyl Art for Bags & Purses

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I’m not a big purse person, never have been, and I don’t care to have decorated ones as a result. The idea of customizing one though? Sign me up!

This idea comes from the folks at StudioDIY, and is all about making a custom donut image for your round purse, but if they’re not your thing, I don’t see why you can’t apply these methods there to any purse/bag you like! You’ll want to visit the DIY page to make sure you understand the process to tweak it to your needs, but here’s the quick run down of supplies required for this project.

It involves lots of spray adhesive to get everything together, so you’ll want to make sure you’re in a well ventilated space or outdoors so fumes don’t become over powering. I’m not sure if this would work on fabric, but I think it would since it’s mostly the adhesive keeping things in place. So if you’ll excuse me, I have a blank to tote to customize.


DIY Picnic Blanket

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While you wouldn’t know it in some parts, Spring is almost upon us and I for one can’t wait to say goodbye to cold winter weather. In celebration of that, I thought I’d share this project for making your own Picnic blanket so it can be enjoyed as early as possible. 😀 For this project you will need:

  • 1 vinyl or waterproof tablecloth
  • 1 cotton tablecloth of matching size (48×60 is a common one)
  • 3 yards of twill ribbon (cut in half.
  • thread to match your tablecloth
  • Sewing Machine
  • Sewing Pins

You’ll want a nice flat area you can lay booth table cloths out on so you can pin the edges together. While doing this, take the two ribbon strips and fold them in half. Then, place them 1/3 and 2/3 of the way on the short end between the two cloths with the middle folded section on the inside. Make sure to pin them in place as you’ll be using these to tie the blanket closed.

 

With your blanket pinned, simply sew around the edges to bring everything together. When sewing over the ribbon section, be sure to back-stitch/reverse over them to make them more secure. You’ll be pulling on this point when you tie it closed so you want it to be reinforced. Once it’s all sewn up you’re done! Roll it up and place it in your car to be ready for your first spring picnic. 😀


Making Your Own Luck

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Happy Sunday, all!

This coming week includes a very special day of the year for me – St. Patrick’s Day! I have a rather large affinity for my Irish heritage, always having been obsessed with stories and images of the island, it’s music, and the knot work that is often incorporated into Irish art. One of the most prevalent symbols of the particular day, though, has been the shamrock. This humble little plant, found in grassy knolls across the world is a symbol of pride and tradition to those of Irish origin and descent. It’s considered lucky to find a four-leafed clover but the three-leafed shamrock (origin of the word in Irish Gaelic simply means “little clover”) is also a source of luck, inspiration, and spirit, especially on St. Patrick’s Day. It’s usually a bit too cold yet here in the Midwest to find a field of clover so we’ve been forced to make symbols of our own. I’ve found some great ideas all over the web for “greening up” the place!

First up is for those with a rather large stash of washi tape:

If this inspires you to start a washi tape stash, I am so sorry.

Or how about something for that big tin of buttons (or maybe raid grandma’s?):

Everyone still plays the cookies or buttons in the tin game, right?

Do you perhaps have some Scrabble tiles from other projects? Then this may be the project for you:

Or maybe just a game of Scrabble that happens to be missing some pieces?

I’m a rather large fan of this burlap and felt wreath, especially for the little rainbow that’s included:

Those super cute shamrocks could be used for other things as well.

Lastly, to adorn yourself in a bit of greenery, there is always a bit of crochet to be had:

Cute and easy with a little safety pin on the back!

I wish you luck and light this week and all the rest of the year. We’ll see you next week wherein I’ll start digging up some spring inspired projects!

Stay crafty!

~Laura


Barn Quilts

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At the London Friendship Quilt Guild yesterday Gardiner’s Gate spoke to us about the history of Barn Quilts and how they make them.  I am sad to say I had never heard of a Barn Quilt until last night so I want to share their history with you.

Craftsy gives us a great explanation.

A BARN QUILT IS A LARGE PIECE OF WOOD THAT IS PAINTED TO LOOK LIKE A QUILT BLOCK.

Even though the name implies that an entire quilt is painted onto the wood, it generally is only a single quilt block. The size of the squares vary, but usually, they measure 8 feet. After they are painted, these blocks are hung on the exterior of a barn, house, garage or other building.

The majority of barn quilts are comprised of simple geometric shapes, like squares, rectangles and triangles. This makes them easier to create. They usually are painted in solid colors, though every now and then, you’ll come across one that has been painted to look like printed fabric. The simplicity in shape and the vibrancy of solid colors make these blocks easily seen from afar. If they are too complicated, the details can be lost.

THE EARLIEST VERSIONS OF BARN QUILTS HAVE BEEN AROUND FOR HUNDREDS OF YEARS.

Just as fabric quilts have their own unique history, so do barn quilts. While barns were not painted back in the day, they were decorated with different types of folk art. This included quilt blocks once paint was readily available and affordable. People chose certain blocks to reflect particular meanings.

In the early 2000s, barn quilts start showing up again, and these are the ones we are used to seeing today. This is also when the first quilt trail began, originating in Ohio.

A quilt trail consists of many barn quilts that are mapped together and visited. Those following along the trail receive a map with all of the locations marked, and viewers drive through the countryside to see all of the blocks. Today there are quilt trails all over the United States and Canada. A wide variety of people have created them, including quilt guilds, schools, churches, and 4-H clubs.

Want to find a quilt trail?

Barn Quilt Info has a map of all of the quilt trails in the United States.  Ontario Barn Quilt trails have a map of all of the quilt trails in Canada.

Want to make a Barn Quilt of your own?

Wikihow

An Oregon Cottage

The Quilt Ladies

If you make a barn quilt of your own, share it with us!  Now to convince my family to help me make one for our home.

-Toni


DIY Simple Paper Cup Gift Box

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Gift wrapping can be hard. Like, really hard. Have something weirdly shaped or super small? You’ll be better off just using a gift bag most of the time. While I don’t have the perfect solution to large weird shapes this time, I have a pretty simple and cheap DIY for making one out of a paper cup.

Made by the folks at fabartdiy, this simple image guide shows how to turn any 10oz or large paper cup into a cute and simple gift box. The supplies you will need are:

  • Scissors
  • Paper Cup 10oz or larger
  • Sticker for sealing
  • Stickers/markers for decorations (optional)

You start by cutting the top rim off the cup (typically this is white). Then make 8 equal length vertical cuts around the top. Once that’s done simply fold the tabs in, making sure to go clockwise around as you do with each tab overlapping on the right side. Push them all down and seal with a sticker. Done! ^_^  Use them for wrapping gifts to even for making little grab bags for your shows  if you have small items like stickers or charms.


A Bit of Spring Cleaning

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Happy Sunday, all!

The up and down weather has continued here but the warm temps have definitely outweighed the cold ones! As it stays brighter longer and the breeze is full of the smell of growing things, my mind inevitably turns to…cleaning! Purging! Out with the old! Seriously, I’ve been putting some real effort into using/recycling/pitching many of those things that have been cluttering up my space. What I’ve found should be no surprise as I am a self confessed fabric and yarn hoarder but I’ve also found a lot of scraps. I *know* I’ll use them but the question is when? Right now, I say! Easter/May Day/Mother’s Day and other celebrations are afoot and what better way to bust some scraps than to make things, especially useful things like this earbud pouch:

This looks like the perfect way to keep them untangled and easy to find.

You could definitely experiment with different pattern and zipper combinations. Along with that pouch, I am always fighting with my various device charging cords so you could also use scraps to make a cord keeper:

Keeping those cords organized in a stylish way!

Now we don’t have to JUST make useful things, there are plenty of pretty projects to use up those fabulous colorful or fancy scraps like this bracelet:

Which could include more than one fabric type for more texture.

Or these bobby pins:

Imagine what I could do with all of my character fabric!

Or even these fabric flowers:

They will last a lot longer than their regular counterparts and you could put some potpourri in the planter so that they still smell lovely.

Now doesn’t that feel good? Even if I didn’t offer something you may want to try, I assure you that there are dozens of other scrap project lists out there. We’d love to see some of yours, too! I’m off to sort through another mountain of stash fabric in the meantime.

Stay crafty!

~Laura


Playing with Log Cabin Blocks

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This video appeared in my feed the other day from Fons & Porter and I loved it.  Toby Lamb Lischko takes Sara Gallegos through all the ways a Log Cabin block can be laid out and used.

Log Cabin Quilt Block Play with Toby Lischko

Log Cabin quilt layouts made easier with pointers from quilter Toby Lamb Lischko and host Sara Gallegos @Sew Positively Sara! Here are some extra tips that didn't make it into the Love of Quilting episode, A Formal Affair. Baby Lock USA Koala Studios APQS Paintbrush Studio, a division of Fabri-Quilt, Inc.

Posted by Fons & Porter's Love of Quilting on Friday, February 17, 2017

I love Log Cabin quilts but the blocks can seem hard to make since the pieces are so small.  They are surprisingly easy though.  Here are some great patterns and resources if you want to make a Log Cabin quilt yourself.

A free tutorial for a 12″ Block.

A free tutorial for a 14″ Block.

One of my favorite patterns is the Quilt in a Day Log Cabin.

Or if you want to be even more adventurous join the Fons and Porter mailing list and they will give you an ebook with traditional Log Cabin quilt blocks, as well as variations, such as Chevron and Courthouse Steps quilt blocks.

Have you made a Log Cabin quilt?  Share it with us!

-Toni