DIY Awesome Framed shelves.

Posted on

Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

I have a lovely tutorial today brought to you by Shanty 2 Chic  that transforms frames into fabulous little shelves where you can display anything from books to collectables. You can find the whole tutorial here, but I’ll give you the basic rundown with some photos from both this website and others to give you some inspiration.

Beautiful white painted frame shelves.

Your first task is to assemble what you need to make this business happen! First you will need your frames. You can decorate old ones you have lying around, buy cheap ones at a garage sale or second hand store to dress up, or buy new ones that you can dress up or leave bare, whatever you prefer! And of course the number you make is up to you. With your frames, you’ll need to remove the glass, the backing and any hardware that is attached to the frame itself.

Your next step is to measure your frames – measure the inside of the frame and cut the wood (1 inch by 4 inch cut to your measurements). You can use scrap boards, as long as you have the means to cut it, and it doesn’t really matter the type of wood. If you don’t have the means to cut it, many hardware stores that sell unfinished wood will help you with this. Make two cuts for each side (as pictured above). Keep in mind that you do not need to have the boards set inside the lip where the glass used to sit. Just keep it a little bit bigger than that edge so that you have a little room for error and a little breathing room so we don’t give ourselves anxiety attacks over worrying about millimeters.

Next you will need to build your square. This tutorial recommends first gluing all the sides together with Gorilla Glue or wood glue, and then nailing them together either with a nailgun or just a good old fashioned hammer.

You should end up with a frame like this (pictured above), that is smaller than your actual frame.

This poster uses the same process of first gluing the picture frame to the crafted frame and then using 1 1/4 inch brad nails, they nailed through the front of the frame to hold onto the back securely.

You have a couple small last steps before you can display your marvelous DIY for all the world to see. First you’ll need to get a little tube of hole filler (found at your local hardware store) to fill the little holes left by the nails. And after that is dry, it’s time to paint your frame! You can use a spray paint to do it all one colour, whether it’s metallic or neon pink or just a plain, sophisticated white, or you can crack out your artist’s palate and paint them all individually by hand in whatever artistic way you can imagine.

Your last step is to hang them on the wall. Just be sure to buy some picture hanging supplies so that you don’t do any undue damage to your walls, especially if you’re going to be putting anything heavy on your shelves. If you’re not going to be putting anything too heavy inside, you can use these types of picture hanging supplies (one on each side) to hold your frame up and these types of no hole hanging supplies can be found at hardware stores. If you’re going to be putting something heavier on your shelves, I fully recommend heavier hardware.

Taken from Porch – using larger, more ornate frames to create these. Check out second hand and vintage stores for these babies!

I hope that this was an inspiring little DIY. I think it’s a fantastic alternative to bookshelves or whole shelving units that looks a whole bunch more unique and amazing.

Happy crafting!

~ Megan


Dragon Hair Barrettes

Posted on

Back before puberty and genetics completely changed my hair, I used to very thick and wavy hair. Like, can barely put a hair tie around it think. Some days I miss it, but other days I don’t miss the brushing and maintenance involved. One thing I wish I’d had then? Awesome hair pieces like these:

Created in Bulgaria by artisan Ivaylo Zlatev, these are beautifully made hand carved wooden hair barrettes. They’re beautifully created and simple enough to accent just about any outfit so great for daily wear. If Dragons aren’t your thing though, they do make lots of of designs like an Octopus or even just simple geometric shapes. All of them are beautifully done, and if you’re like me and have thin hair, you can instead pursue the lovely collection of hand made woden decorations and toys that are also available in their shop. 🙂


Some Heartfelt Decor

Posted on

Happy Sunday, all!

There’s less than two weeks until Valentine’s Day and I’ve been feeling quite crafty lately (not that there isn’t truly a time when I don’t feel it) so why not dig up some cute V-day DIY décor ideas? I found a few that seem easy and look great, including, of course, one that helps with a little recycling. On that note, first up is this very tasteful cork heart:

Classy and an excuse to drink a little more wine!

The tutorial (found here) is pretty straight forward – use some corks, hot glue, paint, and cardboard backing to give your place a bit of flair! Next up, I was never really a big fan of those little conversation hearts as they all tasted pretty much the same…like chalk. But they are cute to look at! So why not personalize some super sized ones for your wall:

Even if you don’t want to include names, you could make these naughty hearts as well!

Again, this tutorial (found here) seemed straight forward and simple – find the heart shaped wood (I’ve found them at local craft shops), add some paint and ribbon and voila! A sweet little decoration for the home. What about personalizing things a bit further? Do you have some pictures of family sitting around? This next one I simply love and don’t think it should be relegated to JUST Valentine’s décor:

I simply adore the idea of including pics of grandma and grandpa or mom and dad with the kids.

Truly a beautiful expression of how V-day doesn’t have to be about romantic love but love of family, as well. The tutorial (found here) does recommend using high quality paper and a laser printer simply so the images come out crisp and don’t smear but if you wanted to give them a dated, antique feel, I’m fairly certain regular will do just fine. The last tutorial I discovered actually introduced me to a new paper folding technique that I fully plan to put into use in the future, iris folding:

Just like the iris in a camera, these folds draw your eye to the center!

Named after the iris of a camera, this folding technique purposely pulls the eye towards the center of the piece. The tutorial and many others on the technique can be found here. You could make a whole series of these out of different color schemes, frame them, and then arrange them on the walls! I hope you are all feeling the love right now. Next week I’ll have some follow-up ideas on creating some of your own unique Valentine’s greetings.

Stay crafty!

~Laura


D.I.Y Fabric Chandelier.

Posted on

Hello Thursday Crafthackers.

You know, when I first looked at this DIY, I wasn’t sure how I felt about it. The more I looked at it though, the more I started to like it and started to brainstorm how I might do it a little differently. This tutorial is from A Beautiful Mess and you can find the full tutorial here. Probably my favourite thing about this DIY is that it is apartment friendly! To those of you who don’t have the space to do anything big, the permission to tear down walls or make too many holes in them, or who just plain want to have some nice looking things without the time/space/money investment of buying and installing a super statement piece, this may be for you! I just love how simple the supplies are:

The cooling rack you might be able to find at a garage sale, but you can find them at any kitchen store. Your fabric, any fabric store, but rather than browsing the shelves, I would recommend searching through their bargain bins, and if you’re lucky enough to live near an “end of roll” fabric store or one that has this type of section, then you can get a lot of fabric for super cheap. Your twinkle lights you can find at any hardware store (and if you go after Christmas you might be able to find them on sale). Your lace, you should also check for in bargain bins, or even see if a relative has any lace curtains that they’re getting rid of. You’ll also need 2 hooks that can screw into a wall and a drill.

Your first step of work is to cut your strips of fabric in varying widths, ranging from half an inch to two inches. This will help give depth and make your chandelier more interesting. Next, you can create texture by loosely stitching through them with the embroidery thread and bunching them before tying a knot in the thread. Here’s a video to show you how ruching works with fabric so you can get an idea of how easy this actually is. It can be done by hand for loose gathers or machine for tight. For your ruched strands, spread them out evenly and make sure to leave enough thread so you can tie them to the rack.

Starting about 5 rows from the outer edge, fold the ends of each strip of fabric over the rod, and hand stitch each foldd flap to the strip (see the photo above to see what words have trouble saying). You should vary shades, textures and thicknesses, but on the inside rows you should use more thicker ones. They will need to cover your lights and add density to your chandelier. Tie a knot at the end of the row (you can just sew continually without having to tie off on every strip) and trim  your thread. Repeat this until the outer 5 rows on each side have been covered. You will want to use thinner strips and lacy fabrics on the outer row.  Add 3 or 4 strips of fabric along the middle rows, just at each end (again, please check out the photo. You will be making a box of fabric). You will end up with a big hole in the middle for the lights to hang and for some thin strips to be added.

. Use a thin strip and wrap it around the edge of your sheet to cover the exposed metal. Stitch together at each end to secure, and do the same on the other side. It’s just like wrapping coat hangers to give them a little more pop.

Carefully attach your twinkle lights. Start with the plug near the back left (or right) corner and tie it near the top with a thin strand of fabric or with white twist ties. Continue to tie up your lights in three or four places, but be sure to let them hang down so that you will get light through the whole chandelier. Just don’t let them hang down below the fabric.. Cut 3 strips of fabric measuring about 2.5″ in width and stitch them together at the end, and do this 3 more tiems. You will need 4 sets of 3 pieces stitched together. I would start by making them double the length that you will need for hanging, as you will be braiding them and it is easier to trim fabric than it is to add. If you want to skip these steps entirely, you can just use sections of chain that you can buy at any hardware and even fabric store.

Pull one strand through the corner, and then braid the three strands together. This will support one corner. You’ll need to repeat this step for all 4 corners. If you have the patience to do the fabric  braiding, it will help hide the cords for the lights. You can attach your extension cord to the plug on the lights (which should be attached at one corner already), and braid it with the strand on that corner. Draw all 4 strands up so that they are equal in length and then tie them in a large knot.

Drill a pilot hole in your ceiling and hang a strong hook where you’d like to hang your chandelier – or you can use a hook you might already have. You may want to drill a second hook to hold your extension cord away from the light, and then you are ready to plug and have a statement chandelier! You can trim your fabric to be any height you like and you can do varying lengths if you prefer.

It looks pretty neat photographed in the daylight, but I think it would look so amazing at night. So to keep in mind, you don’t need to use cream fabric, if cream isn’t your thing.  You can always mix and match different colours, just be aware of how thick or transparent the fabric is. Black and red would look amazing, but you would need to make sure that your blacks are a little more transparent so that it doesn’t just block out all the light.  If you don’t mind seeing the twinkle lights, you could use lace, chiffon and other semi-transparent fabrics. If you’re feeling super arts and crafty, you can add rhinestones, or crystals, and if you’re a fan of things being rainbow, consider using multicoloured lights with cream. I hope that you enjoyed this simple and yet impressive tutorial.

Happy crafting!

~Megan

 


DIY Doorknobs.

Posted on

Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!
I found something that’s a super cool, super cheap way to do an update to your kitchen cabinets, closets and wherever else might use a knob. I bring you, from The Painted Hive, a fabulously easy and cheap doorknob tutorial (you can find the full one here, with a plethora of photos) that can look super cool when it’s done.

These are super easy and you don’t need many tools or supplies. You will need some plain timber knobs that you can find at any hardware store (in whatever size would work for you), spray/craft paint, clear matte spray sealer, scissors, a paint brush, an adhesive (mod podge a similar craft glue will work just fine), and images, paper (as well as a printer and a connection to the internet will make this much easier), and paint to match the images you’ve chosen.

Notice how the colours of the knobs match the background colours of the images – this will help keep the illusion of seamlessness.

 

Your first step is to use your computer to create or find an image that you’d like to see on your knob and scale down to fit on the size that you’ve chosen. Print your images out onto regular copy paper, and colour match the background of your image with the paint you are using for your knob. Then, you can go ahead and paint the knob your colour, and be sure to let it dry.

Lightly spray your images with a clear matte sealer. This will give your images a protective coating and stiffen them slightly to keep the ink from running and the paper from bubbling and buckling when you’re gluing them.

 

Once they’re dry, cut the images out, cutting as closely as you can to the symbol using very sharp scissors or a craft knife.
Using your paint brush, apply a thin coat of adhesive to your knob, and while the glue is still wet, position your image in place. Press down firmly and smooth out any air bubbles, making sure that you keep your eye on the edges and that they are all nicely attached.

When you’re done, give your knobs a few sprays of the matte spray sealer. For extra protection finish off your project with a few coats of brushed-on clear acrylic poly too.  And you’re done!

You can do this with almost any image you can find, so be creative and find ones that speak to you.

Hope you guys enjoyed this, have fun, and as always…

Happy Crafting!

 

~Megan


DIY – Exploding Death Star Lamp

Posted on

So I found this awesome little Gem over the weekend that I just knew I had to share with my fellow geeky crafters. 😀 It’s a fairly low cost project, but it will take you some time, and lots of painting.

Here’s your materials list:

  • IKEA PS 2014 Lamp
  • Light Grey Spray Paint
  • Masking Tape
  • X-acto Knife
  • Dark Grey Paint (either acrylic or spray depending on color options in your area)
  • Sealant Spray Paint

You’ll find the full step by step instructions over here. The quick and short of it though, is you’ll be spray painting the whole lamp shell with the light grey spray paint first, and marking and using masking tape to block certain areas off once it’s dried. After that you paint the whole thing again; with the darker spray paint if your lucky, of by hand if you’re not. Do one more round of spraying (2 if you’re paranoid) with a sealant spray and you’re done! It’s a pretty simple project that could easily be done in the afternoon if you have all the materials. 🙂 Then you too will be able to explode the Death Star whenever you like!


Dr Who Rug DIY

Posted on

Hi there Thursday readers!

I found a super cool, super easy DIY that I had to share with you. It’s also done on the cheap, as most of what you need can be purchased readily and cheaply at any craft store. I love Our Nerd Home, and this tutorial comes from there. You can find the full one here.

That’s right. It’s a Dr. Who runner rug. All made from a beige rug (beige is key since that’s a huge colour in the Tom Baker Dr. Who scarf) from a hardware store. For this project you will need: Light coloured runner carpet, paint – you can look at the photo above for suggested colour types: yellow, blue, green, red, purple, and brown but you can use any you like that speak to you of Tom Baker’s Dr. Who (this tutorial used a mixture of types – acrylic craft paint and latex paint samples). You will need textile or fabric medium (this is a substance that you add to paint to use it to paint fabric), sponge brushes, painter’s tape, a tiny crochet hook, a few shades of yarn, a ruler, and superglue.

Your first step is to use painter’s tape and mark off stripes on the carpet. Use your ruler to make sure they’re even – measure at both sides and at the middle.

Next, before you start painting, you’ll want to mix your fabric paint with the textile medium so that it won’t chip and can even be washed.When you paint the actual carpet, you want to stipple the paint rather than brush the paint on (like tapping the sponge onto the fibers to really get the paint in there)

The stripes will have to be done in a couple different stages, since many painted stripes are right next to each other. The first round of painting, it will be easiest to paint every other stripe. Pull off the tape, let it all dry for an hour or two, and then tape along the edge of the previously painted stripe so that you can paint the one next to it without it looking icky.

You can let it dry and stop there. Or if you feel the need for fringe, then you’ll need wool in colours that match your stripes. You can cut them as long as you want your tassels to be (but double it in length as you’ll be folding it in the middle). Then, just stick a small crochet hook right through the rubber backing on the runner to do a basic fringe (which is basically a slipknot). A little dab of superglue on each little fringe will keep it in place.

And that, my friends, is one of the coolest rugs ever.

Enjoy!

~ Megan


Adorable Octopi Ornaments

Posted on

Like Sea Creatures? Well, then I have got some of the most adorable ornaments for you this Holiday Season.

This beautiful pieces was hand blown by Etsy studio Full Blown Glass. Based in North Carolina, they have a wide variety of all things nautical (which I respect as a fellow East Coast artist ^_~ ) but their Octopus Ornaments really caught my eye.

Their work is beautifully detailed, and their spheres are simply on point for shape and size. That it’s all hand blown means it’s just wizardry to me. Besides the decorative pieces in this shop (which include a face hugger ornament!) you’ll also find practical everyday use glass wear at their sister shop; Andromeda Glass. While they won’t get to you in time for Christmas, they do have some non-holiday decorations should you find yourself in need of a fancy straw or maybe a terrarium? If you love nautical creatures their shop is at least worth a look through. 🙂


Giving Zen

Posted on

Hi there Thursday readers,

During the holiday rush of trying to find the perfect gift or just trying to get a little shopping done without being stampeded by crowds while trying to replace your worn out winter boots, everyone can use a little extra zen. So here’s a couple lovely, and easy gifts that you can make either for your home or to give as a gift to someone special who needs a little extra relaxation. This is from Gardenista (you can find the full DIY here)

To make this fabulous and innovative take on the mindful garden, you will need a Calocehalus or Silver Plant , a European or “false” cypress or Port Orford Cedar, and Club Moss. You should be able to find these at garden stores. You can use other plants, succulents or air plants if you won’t be able to water them. It’s all about how much upkeep you’re going to want to do, and this example is just a template.

You will also need a shallow vessel like a pie plate or something similar in depth but a different shape. Take a look at kitchen stores and I’m sure that you can find a serving vessel that would work in interesting shapes.  You will need some beach stones (you can collect them or you can buy them – sometimes in specific colours at pet/dollar/garden stores), and you will also require some potting soil.

Next you will need to create a base. Place the potting soil in the area that you’d like to have the plants, and rocks in the remainder.

A couple things to note, if you’re planting a mini cypress tree, it will need upkeep like a bonzai tree and so it will need to be trimmed and taken care of. It will also need to be anchored in place by another plant (the moss is used here). Also remember that this is a zen garden that requires a little sunlight for these plants, so make sure there’s a little light available to help them out.

You can add a second layer of rocks of different shapes, if you have them. Instead of raking sand in this garden, you will be moving the stones and changing the scene in this way.

 

You can choose whatever other accents you might like to add, like branches or flowers (fake if you prefer not to change them out) and play around with the rocks to find pleasing ways to arrange them. And you’re done!

If you would prefer to make a simpler Zen garden, here is a tutorial for a sand garden where you can use succulents or air plants or even fake plants to achieve your goal, and you can find the tutorial from Dwell Beautiful here.

Happy crafting!

~ Megan


Stockings to be Stuffed

Posted on

Hello Sunday readers!

We now have some ornaments and wreaths that have been made out of recycled materials so to make the place even more festive, let’s make some stockings! I’ve seen a lot of tutorials on upcycling sweaters and this one is pretty straight forward:

Super cozy stockings for lots of swag.

Super cozy stockings for lots of swag.

Or how about that favorite pair of jeans that you just can’t seem to part with but have holes in embarrassing spots? Let’s make them into a festive memorial:

More pockets = more room = more treats!

More pockets = more room = more treats!

Do you still have some ties leftover from last week’s wreath project? Use them to make a matching/accenting stocking:

So colorful!

So colorful!

This last one was actually pretty near and dear to my heart. What if you have a quilt that is just so old and loved that it is literally falling apart? You don’t want to completely trash it and there is really no saving it so make part or parts of it into some beloved stockings:

Just don't pack it too full unless you line it with something heavy duty!

Just don’t pack it too full unless you line it with something heavy duty!

So now that you’ve got all of these lovely stockings to hang by the chimney with care, what if you don’t have a mantle, let alone a chimney? There is a recycled solution out there for you, too. It involves an old headboard, paint, and some pegs:

Just make sure to mount it properly otherwise there will be new holes in the wall from the weight of the loot!

Just make sure to mount it properly otherwise there will be new holes in the wall from the weight of the loot!

The whole place should be looking cheery and festive now! There’s only one more Sunday before the big day so I’ll be back next week with some recycled gift ideas.

Stay crafty!

~Laura