DIY Tie Die Dog Leash.

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Hi there Thursday Crafthackers!

Love this little tutorial from StudioDIY, partly because it’s super easy, but also because it involves some minimal materials to make a great gift for you and your pooch or for another dog lover. I also love that it uses tie dye paint, which is meant to have things dipped in it, and is also meant to blend with the other colours, so makes something like this super easy.

Your first step is to get some tie dye paint – you should be able to find some at any craft store but it can also be ordered. Mix the dye with water in the bottles according to the package directions. The dyes are super bright when made this way, and if you want a bit of a softer colour, you can squeeze some into glass bowls and mix with additional water (1:3 ratio). It just depends how bright you’d like your piece.  You’ll also need to buy a white cotton leash from any pet store.

 

Next, choose which colours you’d like to use, and how long your leash is. If your leash is 6 feet long, you could choose 6 colours, one for each foot. But you can do whatever combination you’d like. Just organize everything beforehand so you don’t have to be fiddling with dye in the middle of your project.

Lay down some protective plastic, make sure you’re wearing some gloves so you don’t dye your hands, and then start dying the handle end of the leash first. Dip it into your first colour and let it sit for about one minute. Remove and continue with the next colour.

The colours will (and should) blend together, so don’t worry if there’s some bleeding or overlap. If you have an extra pair of hands, this will make everything easier, so you might want to phone a friend to come by. When you’re done, let the colour sit in the leash for 8 or more hours before you give it a thorough wash in the sink.

And that’s a super easy way to make gifts for your animal loving friends, to to have a fantastic dog leash for yourself.

Happy crafting!

~Megan


DIY: Mini Mummies

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Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

I found an amazingly cute and easy Halloween decor DIY that I couldn’t pass up sharing with you. They are as the title describes, and the original post I came across can be found here.

For this project you need a few supplies, but they’re pretty easy to find at any craft and fabric shop. You’ll need some styrofoam balls (whatever size you like, or varying sizes), muslin (at least 1/4 yard, but more if you’re going to be making many), eyelets or brads, tea bags, a spray bottle, 22 gague floral wire and glue.

Your first step? Make a cup of tea for you and a cup of tea for your mummies. That’s right… the tea for you is fuel for your day. The tea for your mummies is to give them a spray at the end for colour.

Next, select a styofoam ball and press two eyelets or brads between the middle and top of the ball as eyes (you can dab them in a little glue for better hold, if you like).  For legs, cut two pieces of the floral wire, and bend each into an oval. Stick them into the bottom of the ball. You can choose to make them whatever length you prefer, so if you want a mummy with super long legs and a wee little head, it can be done!

Cut 3/8 inch wide strips of muslin and begin wrapping the ball until it is covered, going around the eyes and legs. Use glue to adhere the ends of the strips on the ball.

Remove the tea bag from the mummy tea and put it into the spray bottle. Spray the mummy lightly and let it dry. When it’s dry, give it another spray and continue this process until you get the colouring you like, and just like that, you have a cute collection of the undead.

Happy Crafting!

~Megan

 


DIY: Light Up Halloween Tree

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Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

I came across this lovely DIY that is amazingly versatile since you can apply the same techniques to different holidays. All you need to do is use different colours and accents. Since Halloween is coming up soon though, it’s going to be a Halloween one, because it’s a holiday I love. I didn’t make this up myself, so you can find the full and original tutorial here.

You’ll need some materials, but they can be found at craft stores or hardware stores. If you make these a little closer to the holiday, you can often find the seasonal stuff on sale. You will need a 54″ tomato cage (lots of hardware stores sell them year round, but if not in your area, you could always order one) and you could do it any size for your space with a tutorial for making one from a larger cage here, but we will do this larger size for outdoor. You will also need 10-15 zip ties, 2 sets of 100 christmas lights (white works well with any colour ribbon, but keep in mind, if you can find other colours, purple or green would look just amazing), 5 rolls of mesh ribbon, 100 black pipe cleaners and extra seasonal decorations of your choice (like spiders, witches hats, sparkly pumpkins…)

If you’re going to be putting your tree into some soil, in a pot or on the ground, you can cut the widest ring off the cage so you can create stakes to hold them in place.You could also skip this step and have it sit on a flat surface, though you might need some extra ribbon.

Use a zip tie to attach together the top of the tree (the bottom of the cage) to create a tip that comes together.

 

Start adding lights and loop them around and around, using the zip ties to secure them every so often when they get droopy. You’re now ready to cut your ribbon.

 

You can use scissors. But if you have a rotary cutter, you can go for that too. Cut them at 10″ each so if you have 10″ wide ribbon, you’ll end up with 10″ squares.

Attach one pipe cleaner to the cage.

 

Accordion fold two pieces of mesh and hold them side by side.

This photos is with the two sets of two (so there’s 4 accordion folded pieces of mesh)

Twist them in the pipe cleaner. Repeat this at least twice per pipe cleaner, and keep adding the mesh until the tree is covered. You can clip any ends of pipe cleaners if they are a little long, but save them so you can use them to attach the decor.

Attach your little seasonal decorations to the pipe cleaners (or add in any extras you might want to). This tutorial writer even added witches legs, that would be super easy to do and super cute coming out of the bottom of a planter pot.

It just looks so good with the lights, it’s unbelievable!

 

And you’re done. And  you’re fabulous. And the best part is that after this tutorial you have a beautiful Halloween tree that’s covered in sparkly decorations and lights up when you plug it in.

Happy crafting!

~ Megan

 


DIY: Halloween Burlap Table Runner

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Good morning Thursday Crafthackers.

I’m not sure about where you’re living, but where I’m living, a spectacularly hot few days have finally ended and we are into weather that is more appropriate for fall. This gets me thinking about jackets, hats, scarves and of course, Halloween. There’s something beautiful about Halloween decor that is not only season appropriate but also a beautiful addition to the home. It tickles something inside me and reminds me of my youth. I have a tutorial today for you to make a table runner which is highly customizable and looks so cool when it’s done.

You can find the full tutorial here, but I’ll be giving you the rundown. You will need a few supplies. Burlap, being one, and some form of cheap fabric to line the runner with – it can be unbleached cotton or muslin, but check out your remnants bin at your local craft store and see what’s there. You can either buy a section long enough for your runner, or you can sew a couple sections together if you’d like to be a little more economical. You’ll also need freezer paper, spray paint, some kind of cutter or exacto knife. I would say that instead of spray paint, you could also use some stenciling brushes and paint if you’re got some already at home, or there are colours you want to use. Just keep in mind washability. Since this is a seasonal item, I usually don’t worry too much about it, but you might want to get some fabric paint that you’ll be able to wash afterwards.

Your first step is to decide how long you’d like to make your runner. Make it long enough so it can hang nicely over the edges of your table. This tutorial had a finished size of 11″x88″, but it isn’t necessary for it to be that long. Next, cut your burlap wider than you’d like the actual runner to be. Burlap can fray very easily, so leave an inch and a quarter on each long side of your runner.  You will want to cut your lining material 1 inch wider than your finished runner.

Next, with the waxy side of your freezer paper facing down, cut out the design. You can either hand draw your design, or you can print it out on regular paper and use that as your negative design – just make sure that you attach the freezer paper to it so that your burlap is fully covered. Use the knife to cut out your design, and just be careful to have nice clean edges. To help you get cleaner edges, you can iron your freezer paper to the burlap with the wax side down so it will stick and give you some nice sharp edges.

You can  put designs anywhere you want, whether it`s just at the edges or along the centre as well. Just make sure that you cover any space you don`t want painted as if you’re using spray paint, you can have quite a wide spray radius.

 

 

Next, spray over the designs onto the burlap, or use your stencil brush and paint to fill in the negative space. Make sure your paint is even and when everything is dry, you can remove the paper.

You can now place the runner and the lining together, with right sides together and pin. The burlap is bigger than the lining, and that’s okay, remember, we wanted to account for any fraying. Stitch a half inch seam down both sides, leaving the end open. Trim off any excess burlap so that your seam allowances are even.

Turn the runner right side out and iron, design side down. Please put an old towel underneath your design so you don’t get any paint to stick in places you don’t want it to.  Fold the ends of the runner so that the raw edges are tucked in, and if you want to put some trim on the edge of your runner, cut a piece to fit and pin, then top stitch all the layers together – do this for both sides.
That’s all you need to make this beauty! I love that it works for us creative types that can’t actually draw, and so that makes me a happy lady.
Hope you enjoyed the DIY, and happy crafting!
~Megan

DIY: Mosaic Tray

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Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

I have a tutorial for you today from Sand and Sisal to make a sea glass mosaic serving tray. You can find the original post here.  What I love about this tutorial is that it’s a basic tutorial that doesn’t have to be applied to only sea glass. You can use tiles, flat stones, flat glass tiles, or broken plates. This process can be applied to anything you’d like to turn into a mosaic, which is possibly why I love being able to write about a process like this.

For this you do need some specific supplies, but they are things that you might have lying around, or they’re easy to find at any hardware store. You’ll need a wood serving tray (you can buy one new or you can check second hand and vintage stores to see what’s around), spray paint, enough sea glass or tile to cover the area of your tray, some ready to use tile adhesive, premixed grout, a toothed trowel, a pallet knife, a rubber tile float, and a sponge.

Your first step – if your tray has been finished, is to sand the tray with 100 grit sand paper to remove any shiny lacquer.

Your next step is to give the try a couple coats of the (wood suitable) spray paint in the colour of your choice.

With a toothed trowel, apply a thin coat of adhesive to a small part of the tray base and comb the teeth through the adhesive. If you’re using a large trowel, you can use a pallet knife to spread the adhesive into the small corners and edges, and then comb it afterwards.

For the best result, try to work in small sections. It’s important that the adhesive is applied in a thin layer. you don’t want it oozing over the tiles. Start pressing your sea glass (or other tiles) into the adhesive. The tile should sit about half way in the adhesive.  Follow the package directions for the adhesive to set up.

After you’ve placed all your tiles, you can pull out the grout. Put some grout on the float (the rubber scraper thing) and start pressing  and smearing it into the sea  glass so that it gets into all the crevasses and into the edges. Don’t worry about smearing it on top of the glass – it will be smoothed and wiped off the top later.

Once your tray is covered, scrape any excess grout off the top with your float.

Your last step is to clean up that mess! Use a wet sponge to clean up the edges of your tray and to remove the layer of grout from the top of the sea glass or tile. When it looks mostly clean, let it dry. When it’s dry, the glass will look a little dusty, and this is when you can take a clean, damp sponge and buff the glaze off the glass to let it shine.

Et, voila! Your tray is done and ready to be used, or gifted to some lucky friend.

Happy crafting!

~Megan

 


DIY: Vintage Light Fixture Revamp

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Hi there Thursday Crafthackers!

I found a DIY that looks much more complicated than it is, and it is a great way to bring vintage into your home  – or your apartment. The best part is, is that it uses the base of light fixtures that I see in almost every apartment that I’ve been in, and they’re in my apartment right now.

You can find the original tutorial here on A Beautiful Mess, and you really can do any colour you prefer, given that you can use spray paint to either match the pieces to each other or do do it in another colour entirely. You do need some supplies and tools, though. You’ll need a sunburst mirror frame, like this one. You can use any mirror frame as long as it’s easy to remove the mirror so you can use the base. You’ll need a ceiling flush mount light small enough to sit inside your mirror frame, like this one. You will also need gold (or your choice of colour) spray paint, painter’s tape as well as screws and a drill.

As always, we recommend safety first, so since we’re getting into working with light fixtures, you can do this project together with an electrician or a friend with experience, or you can use this guide to help guide your experience. Please make sure that your power is off whenever you’re working on a light fixture. We don’t want any mishaps.

So, depending on what method you choose, you may need to remove the existing light fixture. Since this tutorial uses a light that is a few inches smaller than the mirror frame, paint was added to the ceiling area that would be showing in between the fixture and the mirror. All you need to do is place each fixture where it will go, trace around them and tape off the area that you’re not painting. If you’re worried about using spray paint and the fact that it is airborne and can go anywhere, you can use a liquid paint and brush. Remove the tape when dry (see above).

Using the same paint, paint the base of the light fixture. Just make sure to tape off the back so that there’s no electrical parts that get painted. Add your light bulb and globe shade.

On the mirror frame, you can bend back any tabs that hold the mirror in place and remove the mirror and any backing material from the middle. Just give this frame a coat of the same paint that you used for the rest of the project so that it looks like one unit and there’s no odd colour difference. You can just use 4 screws and wedge them between the spokes of the frame to hold it in place.

When your light fixture is secure, you’re done! It looks fabulous in the gold, but if you’re going for a different kind of retro vibe, you could use a beautiful teal spray paint, or copper. Whatever colour suits your mood and decor!

Happy crafting!

~Megan


DIY Crushed Glass Coasters

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Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

 

I have a super easy but really beautiful tutorial for you. If you were looking to make these as a gift, or decorate your own coffee table, they’re pretty simple and super impressive. The original tutorial can be found here.

You will need some supplies. You’ll need some cork coasters. I would recommend trying to find ones that have a small lip, like these from IKEA.  You will also need a decorative filler (you can explore a local craft store or even the garden/aquarium sections of a dollar store to find something you like).  The filler doesn’t have to be crushed glass, it can be anything you find that you like. Small stones, wee crystals, beads of varying sizes… really whatever you like.

You’ll need whatever colour spray paint you’d like your coasters to be, and some  Mod Podge Dimensional Magic Glue. This type of glue is recommended for the effect that it gives. Most crafting stores will carry this brand of glue or you can ask your helpful salesperson what they would recommend.

Your first step is to spray paint your coasters and let them dry. Next, take your decorative filler and fill your coasters. You just want to use a thin layer, you don’t want to actually fill your coasters. Use your dimensional magic and fill in the coasters. You’ll want to make sure that all of your filler is submerged in the glue so nothing is sticking out. One container of the glue in the size linked above will fill 4 coasters, FYI.

Let them dry for 24 hours, and you have an impressive gift, or addition to your room.

 

Happy crafting!

~Megan


DIY: Lap Desks

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Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

I have a great no-sew DIY for a great lap desk that can be used to have a solid, hard surface for laptops, homework, reading, colouring, or whatever you’d like to use it for. The original tutorial can be found here at A Beautiful Mess.

You will need some supplies: A wooden lap desk top (You can buy one like this, or if you’re super crafty with wood and wood tools, you could make one), a foam square – fabric stores will often carry this, and craft stores might as well. You’ll need some fabric (1/3 – 1/2 a yard, depending on the size of your lap desk top), and trim. As for tools, you’ll need a few. Scissors, fabric glue, staple gun and staples (make sure they’re shorter than the lap desk top), wood stain and brushes (optional).

Your first step is to place the lap desk on the foam and trace the pattern. When you cut the foam though, cut it a little smaller than the top. You can use the scissors to cut the foam, and if your edges aren’t perfect, don’t panic. You’ll hide them. 🙂

If you’re choosing to stain the desk, now is the time. You can stain the tops and the sides of the lap desks. Let them fully dry.

Next, place the foam over the bottom side of the lap desk top (you might want to glue part of it down in the centre so that it stays put) and lay your fabric over top of the foam.  Try to make the edges look clean and pull the fabric tight as you staple the fabric to the desk top, stapling the fabric just underneath the foam to hold it in place – don’t fear stapling some of the foam down as well – this will just attach it more firmly. If any of your staple ends poke through the top of the desk, remove them and try again. No one wants to be bitten by rogue staples when trying to do work. It’s very distracting.

Trim any excess fabric and if you so choose to make a nice clean line at the seam where the fabric was stapled in place, glue some trim at the seam, and wait for it to dry.

And you’re done! Customizable lap desks that are great not just for laptop users, but for kids that like to colour and draw.

Happy back to school!

~ Megan


DIY: Marbled Planters.

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Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

I have a beautiful, easy tutorial for you to spice up your balcony garden, or any place where you’ve got plants. Actually, what I love the most about this tutorial is that it can be used on more than just planters. You could use it on almost anything you can dip. You can find the original tutorial here, and check out how cool this looks…

The best part is that you can walk into any dollar store or craft store and find something you can dip. These can make amazing gifts for birthdays, bridal showers, or even just to give your home a little colour. Just remember that with this particular technique, you’re using spray paint, and so you will want to make sure this all stays on the outside of whatever project you’re doing. I wouldn’t say this is food safe.

So, your first step is to get spray paints of the colurs you would like to marble. RustOleum is recommended if you’re looking for metallics, but the rest is up to you! You will also need a container deep enough for whatever you want to dip. So a bucket or a tote would work very well. You might also want to test your dips before actually working on your piece, so some paper cups would come in handy. You’ll also need some painters tape, if you’re wanting to have some sharp edges. And that will be your first step (see above), to tape off any areas you do not want dipped,  or not, as you prefer.

Start to add your spray paint to the water filled tub. You will need to do this quickly, so read everything first and then start. Make sure to hold your spray can about 10 inches from the water, so you don’t get bubbles that will show up on your finished piece.

Add as many colours as you’d like, and spray them in in different places.

When you’ve added all of your colours, give your bucket a very gentle couple of taps on the side to make waves (not bubbles) to swirl the paint around.

Slowly dip your project into the water. If you go too fast or if your paint is too dry (see my comment about working fast above), the paint surface will break and you will have gaps with uneven edges.

Dip the planter into the water as far as you’d like and hold it there for about 30 seconds while you lightly fan the paint surface to quicken drying. If you used painters tape, it will make it so that any wiggling that would put more paint on in that area, will be removable.

Use a spoon to wipe away all the remaining paint floating on the surface of the water (you might want to use a plastic spoon for that). This will allow your project to come out with a clean design.

Let everything dry completely before you remove your painter’s tape. And voila! You’re done. You might want to give a spray with a sealant if you’re planning on using these outside, so that inclement weather doesn’t have any ill effects on your work of art. Hope you enjoyed the tutorial!

Happy Crafting!

~Megan

 


DIY Travel Checkers

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Good morning, Friday Crafthackers!

We are in the middle of road trip season,  and you know what that means? It means keeping people entertained. In a car. For hours on end. So I bring for you a beautiful little diy that can be brought with you anywhere! You can find the full tutorial here for how to make a travel checkers kit.

You’ll need some supplies: Felt – two colours, 1 piece each at 8″x 8″ for the board. Two colours, one piece each for the tokens at 4″ x 5″. You’ll need one colour of  8.5″ x 8.5″ for the board, and one more colour, two pieces of 9″ x 11″ for the bag, if you’d like to make one. Cotton:  1 piece of 10″ x 23″, to line the bag so it can slip easily in and out. You’ll also need thread, a hot glue gun and glue (optional), buttons (12 of each of two different colours), 2 one yard measured drawstrings that can be made from whatever you like. 2 Pony beads.

To make your checkerboard, cut 8 strips of each colour for your board at 1″ wide and 8″ long. Cut the background piece of felt to 8.5″ x 8.5″. On a flat surface, lay background piece flat and weave the strips together to form the board on top of the background. This can be done by weaving over and under, and centre the board on the background piece so that you have a background border of about half an inch.

Stich the pieces down with a wide zigzag strip, going around the pieces that have been woven to make the board. Make sure to test each strip when you’re done to make sure they won’t pull up, especially ones hidden by the edge strips. Give the edges a second go over if you’re finding anything pulling.

For your tokens, use a quarter or another 1″ circle and trace 12 circles on each of the two different colours of felt you chose for your pieces. Cut the circles just on the inside of your traced lines so you don’t see the ink. Attach your buttons to the circles either sewing by hand or using hot glue. The felt tokens will cling to the board and when they are kinged, you can flip them over and put the two felt sides together and they should cling there as well.

You can follow the directions on the page for a drawstring bag, and there are directions here for a fabric bag. You might also just want to stick this in a little ziplock bag, and be done with it, if you’re anything like me.

Another interesting take on something like this would be to print symbols for chess, and glue them to round buttons (instead of anything else) on the pieces. You could even make two sets of tokens, one for chess, one for checkers.

Happy crafting!

~Megan