DIY: Easy Easter Wreath

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Good morning Thursday Crafthackers!

I have a beautiful little tutorial for you to make an Easter/spring time wreath. The best part is this wreath reuses plastic egg containers that you find all over this time of year for toys, chocolates, and such. So make sure you’re hanging onto the ones that you get, or you can also find plastic eggs in craft stores also.

The original post for this tutorial can be found here, and what you’ll need for this project is relatively simple and easy to find (at your local craft shop). You will need a Styrofoam wreath form, pink (or your choice of colour) streamer paper, and a selection of small, synthetic flowers that match your eggs,  plastic Easter eggs – this tutorial used a package of pink eggs that were purchased from a store, but you can  use any colour you like, decorate your own plastic eggs, or reuse ones that you have laying around from this time of year. You’ll also need a glue gun (low temp to avoid burning) and a wire cutter.

Your first step is to wrap your wreath form in your streamer paper. Just a dab of glue to hold the ends in place will do, and make sure when you’re wrapping, that you’re keeping it tight. You can also use thick ribbon or even tulle for this step. Whatever your preference is!

Start adding your eggs to your wreath. Use a generous dab of glue, and mix up the colours and positions to create a more random style. Make sure to add eggs to the inside and outside edges of the wreath. It’s advised to keep the wreath’s back on a flat surface as you work so that you don’t over egg your wreath to the point of it not laying flat on your door or wall.

Cut your artificial flowers from their stems using a wire cutter, though just make sure to leave about an inch of the stem at the end of the bloom. Add your flowers to the wreath by poking them straight into the foam – this will hold them in place. Fill in any gaps between your eggs with the flowers, and you can put as many or as little as you’d like, and keep adding them until you get the mix of eggs and flowers that you like.

Just as an fyi, this is a better indoor or covered porch wreath as it is slightly fragile. So keep that in mind when you’re looking for a spot to hang. Also keep in mind that if you wanted to add any glitter, or glitter any eggs before attaching them you can do that too!

Happy crafting!



Sewing with Scraps – Cord Wraps

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So the scrap sewing pattern this week was another one that was picked cause I needed something to manage the spaghetti factory of cables I have collected, and comes from Leafy Treetop. I recently gave my sister my old laptop case since she needed one for work and mine was just being used to hold all my various charging cables as I no longer have a laptop. This left me with the issue of about 10 cables that now suddenly needed a new home and to be organized. Time to put that scrap to work!

The time for this was much faster then the mousepad last week since I had no drying time, and once I knew what I was doing, I had these setup assembly line style to sew up and save time. You’ll need 2 scraps that are about 3″x7″ and interfacing (midweight) for each cord wrap, along with a bit of velcro. I buy velcro by the giant spool for my chain chomp plush, so I just cut some off to whatever size I needed but I think anything 1″x1″ or there abouts will work.

Using the template, I cut out the fabric needed for the first few (and then more later cause I didn’t make enough, lol). I decided to frame the images on some of the fabric (known as fussy cutting) so I used more scrap then I had to as a result, but that was my choice so it didn’t bother me toooooo much. Once everything was cut, I ironed the interfacing on the back (or wrong) side of the fabric I wanted to have showing. Then I placed the 2 fabrics, right side facing together, next to my machine to sew.

I sewed around the edge without pins (cause this was so small) about 1/4″ from the edge. I have a special foot that Toni suggested to me for this exact purpose and it really helped a lot. You have to leave about a 2-3″ gap in your sewing so you can turn your piece inside out and then iron and sew around the edge once more.

Now that the body is done, you simply place and sew the velcro on as you desire. the first few I did I used vertical strips just on the ends, but I wanted to be able to tighten it more so for the second batch I had the velcro go horizontal on the body. It does mean the design is covered more, but I know the kind of jostling my cords will take and just felt like the initial batch won’t stay in the keeper as well. Time will tell if I’m wrong about this, lol.

As you can see from this picture of my first batch, I forgot to sew the right sides together on one. Opps! I just said screw it and I’m living with it, but if you were making these as gifts or for someone else, then maybe don’t work at like 10pm like I did, lol. In the end I really liked this pattern. It was very easy to follow (lots of pictures) and a great introduction to interfacing if you’ve never used it before. The pattern is simple and besides the small change in velcro placement I’m very happy with everything. I’d give it a 5/5 bobbins. Highly recommend it.

New needle on the market!

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One of the things I LOVE about the Chrome line of needles is the ability to prevent stickiness building up on the needle.  Schmetz has announced a new needle that does the same thing but in their regular line!

There’s a Stealthy NEW SCHMETZ Needle in Town . . .

It Won’t Leave You in a Sticky Situation!

Tired of gumming up needles with stubborn adhesives? Complaining about missed stitches and thread breakage caused by adhesives? Users of adhesive stabilizers, temporary spray adhesives, or self-adhesive hook and loop tapes can now rejoice!

SCHMETZ Super Nonstick Needle

Slippery surface ensures less “goo” sticks to the needle!


  • Non-stick coating of NIT (Nickel-Phosphor-PTFE).
  • Extra-large eye suitable for embroidery work.
  • Eye corresponds to a needle two sizes larger (i.e., the 70/10 NonStick eye is similar to size 90/14 Universal eye).
  • Distinctive scarf and special eye prevents skipped stitches.
  • Slightly rounded point provides trouble-free sewing on most materials.
  • Strong conical blade reinforcement easily handles thick fabrics like denim.
  • Five (5) needles per card.


  • Machine embroidery
  • Hook and loop tapes
  • General sewing

So look for this great new needle at your local sewing or quilting store!


DIY: Marbled Phone Case

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Good Morning Crafthackers.

I have for you a neat little tutorial for making your own marbled phone case. This is a simple little DIY that would be great for teens or for helping you to accessorize your own phone. This is a great way to add your own subtle customization to your phone without breaking the bank while also being durable. You can use your favorite colours and make a number of different cases to switch out in the different seasons, if you’re the accessorizing type.  I’ve used this tutorial from Lovely Indeed, and feel free to peruse their other DIY projects as well.


Your materials and tools are simple. All you need for this DIY is a clear plastic phone case, nail polish in 3 different shades, a large bowl filled with water and a toothpick or paintbrush.

You need to start with a bowl of clean, room temperature water. When you start this project, you will need to work fast so that the polish doesn’t dry out too quickly, so read to the end of the tutorial before you begin.  You will want to have your nail polish ready and open and within arms reach. Take your first colour and use the nail polish brush to let a few drops drip onto the surface of the water. Drop from about an inch above the surface of the water as much higher will make the polish sink to the bottom of the bowl rather than sitting on the surface. It will begin spreading when it hits the water.

Use the same technique with your other colours, putting a few drops of each over top of the first colour in random spots. The colours should start to mingle and swirl around each other. Use a toothpick or the end of a paintbrush to swirl the colours together to create a marble effect in the water.

Hold your cell phone case – without your phone in it, of course – so that the outside of the case is face down towards the water’s surface. Gently touch it to the surface of the water so that the nail polish adheres to the case. You shouldn’t need to fully submerge it.

When the case is fully covered, remove it and let it dry. If you find there’s any water droplets that got captured under the nail polish, just lightly press on the areas that have a little bubble of water and help work it out towards the edge of the marble effect where you can absorb it with a piece of tissue.

Remember, you can use whatever colours you like. Just be aware that ones with heavy sparkles may sink. You can also do as many colours as you like, just keep in mind, too many may make the marbling just seem a little too messy. Hope you enjoyed!

Happy crafting!






Sewing with Scraps – Mouse Pad

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As Toni can verify, I’ve had a very cautious approach to using a sewing machine. I took classes in school sure, but I was already very good at sewing by hand even then and the machines were so old that half to time they didn’t work. So while I’ve learned a few things and how newer models work, I would still default to hand sewing for years. Well I decided to change all that starting a few weekends back. My sister is a fashion major and, as my birthday gift, offer to sew me a new purse as long as I had the pattern and materials ready for her. After she was done (and it’s super cute) I had about half a yard of scraps that I didn’t want to just toss. My thriftiness wouldn’t allow it! So I scoured the internet for ideas that I could use these bits and pieces for. I found tons of ideas but only about 8 appealed to me. For the next few weeks I’m going to highlight each one I picked, how easy it was for a beginner, and how I feel the final product turned out. Today I started with what seemed to be the simplest of the lot, a mousepad.

Now I’ve been considering buying a mousepad for my desk for a few months as my mouse has worn thru some of the top finish in spots, but it’s started catching on those so the timing here was almost perfect. It would also allow my to make something that would fit the very unusual size I would need (10″ by 6″) for my small desk space. Following the instructions from How Joyful, I gathered my materials.

What you see here is my cut fabric, some dollar store shelf liner, and a paper towel. You basically sandwich these together (fabric, liner, paper towel) and pin in place before sewing – if needed. The paper towel is used to keep the needle from sticking to the rubber bottom of the non-slip liner, so you could use something like tissue paper instead if you don’t have any paper towels on hand.

After you sew around the edge, you then turn it over and slowly rip off the paper towel. Doing the edges first makes removing the middle much, much easier. Try and get as much off as you can since you’ll want the rubber of bottom mat to be able to smoothly touch the surface.

Now for the time consuming part. You flip it back over and apply Mod Podge to the fabric side in a nice even coat. You’ll want 2-3 coats of modge podge total and it’s an hour to dry between coats, so be sure to set it up on some parchment paper or surface you can easily clean. I did my first coat at night and then the second in the morning, but you do with what works for your schedule. Now if yours is anything like mine, the edges started to curl during the drying and I wasn’t having that. I recommend taking a hot dry iron once it’s fully dry (mine was set to cotton since that was my fabric), place parchment paper over the mouse pad and then iron it to fix this.

Here’s my mouse pad at it’s new home. I also trimmed the edges of extra fabric/rubber pad so it looked nice and neat after ironing it. So what did I think of it in the end? Well, there’s a few things I’d change but overall it’s a great easy pattern for a beginner. I don’t like how the surface feels for mine, but that could be on the type of modpodge I used, and it’s much thinner then a normal mouse pad so maybe adding some interfacing on the back of the fabric would fix that issue. Other then that, only time will tell if it holds up to daily use. I rate it 4/5 bobbins. Good and easy, but needs tweaking for personal preference.

A Bit of the Bun

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Happy Sunday, all!

I promised bunnies, so it’s time to make good! Since I’ve been trying to expand my sewing experience lately, most of these DIYs are needle and thread type things. The first of which is a super cute set of bunny hot pads from So Sew Easy:

What could they be taking out of the oven? Could it be carrot cake???

We get to play with InsulBrite AND apply some applique techniques? Awesome! We’ve already got the sewing machine out, so how about some super adorbs carrot treat bags for the little bunnies in the family from Make It Love It:

Perfect for jelly beans or my personal favorite, peanut butter/chocolate eggs.

I was always obsessed by small drawstring bags to carry around my “treasures” when I was a kid, so these seem like just the thing. Ok, so how about a little hand sewing? I do, seriously, mean a little – this darling small felted bunny from Lia Griffith made me squee:

With his tiny toe beans and bitty carrot, just too sweet!

That little guy would be so charming topping off a basket or just hanging around a Spring bouquet, wouldn’t he? Still in the mood for cute and small? Great! Because I found this delightful little tutorial on how to make a fluffy little bunny pom pom on the Pom Maker blog:

They’re so fluffy!

I really can’t get over how boop-able those noses are! Ok, ok, back to the list. The last thing today is super easy and doesn’t take any specialty materials to craft so you probably have all the things already to make these origami bunny bookmarks from Red Ted Art:

Great for holding your place when re-reading Peter Cottontail or any other bunny faves!

I’m quite certain the pattern can be adapted to other woodland critters. There you have it – quite a bit of buns to go around! Spring is just around the corner, I can feel it!

Stay crafty!


Island Batik Blog Hop

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Wednesday I was a part of the Island Batik Blog Hop for their new Elementz line on my own blog!


You can find the other hoppers joining in at the bottom of this post, so make sure you read them all (they may have their own giveaways)!

I was asked by Tamarinis to create something pixelated for her next line of fabrics with Island Batiks.  Why pixelated?  Because I am a pixel quilter! I specialize in video game, pop culture and comic book quilts so took a look at her line of fabrics to get inspiration.

I was immediately drawn to these two fabrics because it reminds me of the Triforce from Legend of Zelda.

So I turned to my business partner for a design and got to work creating the quilt and pattern.  I live streamed the entire process (including messing up the directional fabric) on my Twitch stream.

The finished pattern and quilt turned out great!


To order the pattern for yourself, just click on it above.  Now for GIVEAWAYS!  Yes, we have giveaways.  First up is the Blog Hop Giveaway.

Win an Elementz Fabric Bundle!!!  Just click here and follow the steps to enter.

Next up is my own giveaway.  I am also giving away a bundle of fat eighths of every Elementz fabric in the line along with an assortment of my quilt patterns (including the Triforce inspiration).  Just head over to my contest page and follow the steps to enter.  Drawing will take place next Wednesday March 7!

Make sure you enter both  giveaways!

Now on to the hoppers!

2/26: Tammy Silvers  Tamarinis
2/26: Jessica VanDenbrugh Sew Many Creations https://thestraightstitch.
2/27: Penni Domikis Cabin in the Woods Quilters
2/27: Swan Sheridan Swan Amity Studio
2/28: Kate Colleran Seams Like A Dream Quilts
3/1: Joanne Hillestad Fat Quarter Gypsy http://www.thefatquartergypsy. com/Lex-Luther-Blog.html
3/1:  Connie Kaufmann   Kauffman Designs
3/2: Vicki Hansen Cranberry Pie Designs
3/2: Stephanie Jacobson http://stephjacobson.blogspot. com/
3/3: Pauline McArthur Funky Friends Factory
3/3: Terri Vanden Bosch   Lizard Creek Quilting

DIY: Concrete Lamps

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Good morning Thursday Crafthackers,

Last week we looked at making vases out of concrete. Today, with a tutorial from Brit + Co we will be looking at using concrete again, and using them to make some stylish hanging lamps. You will be able to find the full tutorial here, should you need some more info.

I love that these projects have minimal materials cost and are pretty stylish and sleek. They also recycle some garbage and use it to make these awesome things! Most of the materials are fairly inexpensive and available at most hardware stores. The original poster used Quikrete 5000 concrete mix, an electrical socket, switch and cord, two plastic bottles (one larger and one smaller – think 2 liter and 1 liter… something along those lines), a threaded tube and nuts (3/8th inch diameter tube), 3 1/2 inch deck screw, 120 grit sandpaper and a metal can. Your tools are also pretty simple. A box cutter or knife, a cordless drill with 3/8th diameter standard bit for drilling holes into the caps, wire cutters to cut the cord and strip wires.

First, poke a hole in the soda bottle with a box cutter and use scissors to cut off the bottom of the bottle. Next, drill a hole in the caps of both bottles, which is made significantly easier by keeping the cap on the bottle. The hole should be just big enough to screw the metal tube through.

To connect the bottle caps together, screw the tube through both caps and use nuts on either side of each cap to hold them in place.

Screw both bottles into their caps.

Use the desk screws to keep the bottles stabilized.

Mix the concrete to the manufacturer’s directions and fill the mold. It might be easier to use a spoon to get it in there rather than pouring. Shake and tap the mold after each spoon to make sure everything settles without air bubbles. Use the metal can to stabilize your mold.

After you’ve given the concrete time to dry – I would say at least a couple days, but again, follow the manufacturer’s directions, then it’s time to remove the bottles. You can cut the external bottle away using a box cutter and scissors. With a hair drier you can heat the internal bottle to make it a little softer so you can pull it out with pliers. Sand any rough edges.

Cut the socket end of the wire and thread the cut end through the bolt hole. Strip the wires and twist them together. Cover the exposed metal with electrical tape or wire nuts and make sure the pendant is securely fastened. You can find brackets from furnishing stores with which to hang and the one in this tutorial came from Ikea.

You can mix concrete colours, use different bottles and even change  the way you pour the concrete to get some different and really cool effects.


Happy crafting!

~ Megan